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It's a bit peculiar how meat from a mammal isn't the name of the animal (beef, pork, etc) but meat from a bird is the name of the bird (chicken, duck). Amirite?

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Poultry.

@Cuban_B Poultry.

Yeah that's the generic name for the farm animals but you wouldn't say that you wanted some "fried poultry" instead of "fried chicken".

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are +1Reply
@heethebobo It isn't?

What isn't what?

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are +1Reply
@Chromana What isn't what?

Isn't meat referred to by name?

@heethebobo Isn't meat referred to by name?

You call it "beef" not "cow" though.

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are +3Reply
@Chromana You call it "beef" not "cow" though.

Yes, but we call alligator, shrimp, crawfish, possum, and deer by their names when we refer to them as food. (To name some cajun/redneck food)

@heethebobo Yes, but we call alligator, shrimp, crawfish, possum, and deer by their names when we refer to them as food. (To...

Wow you really do sound like a hillbillie from that list of food!

Well only opossum and deer are mammals from your list. Most people don't eat opossum and people (at least in the UK) call deer meat venison (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venison).

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are +6Reply

(ground) beef and pork (chops) sometimes are, but steak and venison arent. it seems like sometimes yes sometimes no

@name (ground) beef and pork (chops) sometimes are, but steak and venison arent. it seems like sometimes yes sometimes no

I don't understand what you mean. You sometimes call them pig chops and ground cow?

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are +5Reply
@name oh, also forgot to mention, guinea pig, dog, etc

Hey, we're talking about normal things to eat, here.

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are +4Reply
@Chromana Hey, we're talking about normal things to eat, here.

guinea pig is popular in west south america, dog is popular in asia. shall i go on?

@name guinea pig is popular in west south america, dog is popular in asia. shall i go on?

I'm talking about the English language and so obviously the normal food where English is spoken. Why are you trying to be so awkward?

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are 0Reply
@name knowing cultural diversity is awkward?

It's a matter of relevancy. I make a post about the English language being used in "Western" countries (yes, it's implied obviously) and you think it's relevant to bring up other countries with other languages?

That's like me saying that the London Underground is really speedy and then you saying that the Paris Metro is slow. It has nothing to do with what I was talking about. Sure, it's the same sort of topic, but it's not relevant to the specific thing I was talking about.

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are 0Reply
@Chromana I don't understand what you mean. You sometimes call them pig chops and ground cow?

lots of people call pigs "pork", i suppose i was wrong about the beef, although i swear i saw "cow" in a restaurant once...

@name lots of people call pigs "pork", i suppose i was wrong about the beef, although i swear i saw "cow" in a restaurant...

What I was saying is that you don't call the meat by the animal name. Like you wouldn't say you put some cow in your noodles. You'd say you put some beef in.

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are +4Reply
@Chromana What I was saying is that you don't call the meat by the animal name. Like you wouldn't say you put some cow in...

yea, i was wrong about beef, ill admit. but for the foreign foods for english speaking countries, usually they have the name of the animal

It's because of the way English grew and developed! The anglo-saxons and some other place (sorry I don't remember!) kind of melded their languages together and in one place they'd call it one thing, and the anglo-saxons would call it something else so we just ended up keeping both words! One for the animal itself, one for the meat we eat off of it. It developed around the middle english period and it's been that way ever since!

@curiousme It's because of the way English grew and developed! The anglo-saxons and some other place (sorry I don't remember!)...

I am disappoint that you didn't put a "!" at the end of your penultimate sentence.

That doesn't explain why chicken meat doesn't have a different word.

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are 0Reply
@Chromana I am disappoint that you didn't put a "!" at the end of your penultimate sentence. That doesn't explain why...

Its due to the fact that half of the English language comes from french (as indicated by "some other place") and french was used by nobles, etc. mostly in the castles in England after William the Conqueror took the throne in the Battle of Hastings. However the people out in the country/farms and such used the Anglo-Saxon words. Since fancy kitchens covered most dishes, they used french words (beouf -> beef, instead of cow).

Wynauts avatar Wynaut Yeah You Are 0Reply
@Wynaut Its due to the fact that half of the English language comes from french (as indicated by "some other place") and...

That still doesn't explain why chicken meat doesn't have a different name, that just merely explains why it's beef and not "cow meat", like the comment I replied to says anyway.

Chromanas avatar Chromana Yeah You Are 0Reply
@Chromana That still doesn't explain why chicken meat doesn't have a different name, that just merely explains why it's beef...

Well, I don't know exactly why. Maybe chicken wasn't fancy enough to be in the kitchen of castles or something? What I said is a general explanation of what happened, not the origin of every single word.

Wynauts avatar Wynaut Yeah You Are 0Reply
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