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Harry Potter is one of the greatest fictional series ever

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Kiras avatar Books
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One of a very many.

Even though I love Harry Potter probably too much, I don't want to vote on this because there are so many potentially great series that I have never read before

This used to be my attitude towards Harry Potter: YouTube video thumbnail

But then I started reading the first book and immediately got really into it. I was surprised by how well written it was. Harry Potter doesnt get enough credit for that. I read the second one and really enjoyed that as well. I didn't go any further than that and probably won't bother returning to it now, but yeah, based on the first two books, thumbs up.

One of the best series' ever though? I guess I can't really know without reading the rest of them but I'm finding that hard to believe.

I wish The Dresden Files series got as much attention as Harry Potter. Maybe we'd have movies of them too or at least a good show rather than that lame sci fi channel one. Granted, the Dresden Files is not yet complete, and it's not for as young an audiance as Harry Potter.

Why are there so many disagrees? Oh wait, I know why. They know that Harry Potter isn't fictional. Shhh! The muggles on this site might take notice!

I guess it depends on your definition of great, I think it was a very successful teen marketed book that happened to be on the market once the trends shifted to wizards and magic. I wouldn't say it was the greatest fictional book ever, I think I'd more so agree with comedic_philosopher that it will probably be remembered simply as a pop culture icon.

While it might be fantastic in popular culture, I don't feel it has enough philosophical and literally complexity to be considered one of the greatest. I'm sure it'll be remembered for a long time, but mainly as a pop culture icon.

@comedic_philosopher While it might be fantastic in popular culture, I don't feel it has enough philosophical and literally complexity...

Why does something need to be philosophical or complex in order to be good? In my opinion, the only thing that makes a series good is how much you enjoy it.

@comedic_philosopher While it might be fantastic in popular culture, I don't feel it has enough philosophical and literally complexity...

Big words for Mr. I've Never Read Harry Potter

Not only is philosophical and literal complexity not the only criteria, but you can't even make that claim, having never read the books.

@Altoid_Freak_250 How can you even begin to argue in favor of that if you've never read the books?

because i've heard enough from every possible source to know enough about it. Besides every major detail; in the series has been spoiled for me

@comedic_philosopher because i've heard enough from every possible source to know enough about it. Besides every major detail; in the...

I still think you should at least read some of the books before you begin to make a statement like that. It's actually a really good series because of the intricacy of everything and the story itself is engaging.

@comedic_philosopher While it might be fantastic in popular culture, I don't feel it has enough philosophical and literally complexity...

Well, in Greek mythology, a Seer named Casandra was given her powers by a God, but was later cursed so no one would believe them. In HP, the divination teacher made prophesies no one believed, and her Great Grandmother's name was Casandra. There's a ton more references to Greek mythology in it, mostly in the name's of the characters and the spells, but there's quite a few allusions to Greek and Roman mythology stories.

The books are parallel with each other too. The first one, Harry is first brought to the Dursley's, the 7th he leaves them. The first one, Ron sees his deepest desires in the mirror of Erised, the 7th, he sees his biggest fear in the horcrux. Things like that go all the way though with the 6th and the 2nd book and the 3rd and the 5th book.

Some of the characters are also reflections of each other. Harry is an opposite reflection of Voldemort, they share many characteristics but his are used in the opposite direction. Harry and Neville and reflections of each other, too, only they go in the same direction.

The chosen one was never really special. In fact, the name the CHOSEN one gives a hint. Harry was never special. Neville could have been the boy who lived. Both born in July, parents fought Voldemort thrice, etc. The only reason Harry was the boy who lived is because Voldemort chose him- and if Voldemort hadn't chosen him, Harry would have never been a threat to him, the whole "only one can live while the other survives" thing wouldn't have been a thing had Voldemort ignored the prophesy, Voldemort chose him as his equal and made Harry a threat by trying to off him- in other words, it's a self fulfilling prophesy.

There's a whole bunch of other philosophical ideas demonstrated by the story line and a whole bunch allusions, foreshadowing, allegories, motifs, symbolism, anagrams, anastrophes, and about a thousand other literary devices which you would know if you'd bother to read the book.

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