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Science is developing the tools towards de-extinction of species on the planet that have become extinct. The question becomes; Should we?

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I agree the question becomes; should we?

Jurassic park taught us the possible consequences

Yes because I want tasmanian tigers back.

No. Damage has been done. We can't reverse it. We can't play God.

@Kaycee No. Damage has been done. We can't reverse it. We can't play God.

Why not? If we can create life then lets do it. A lot of the animals they'd be able to bring back are the ones we drove to extinction. They didn't just die out, we killed them on purpose. If we killed all the Dolphins tomorrow, I can bet a lot of people would change their opinion and say to bring them back.

@ScottyD Why not? If we can create life then lets do it. A lot of the animals they'd be able to bring back are the ones we...

You've killed them, they're gone. Accept it and move on. Work on keeping the ones we have. If you killed a race of people, would you bring then back?

@ScottyD Yes, because they shouldn't have been wiped out.

But its already happened.. We should be working on STOPPING them from being wiped out than having a back up plan for when we do wipe them out.

@death_or_glory why

I feel like a broken record when I keep explaining this...

Around 12-25 species that are here today, won't be here tomorrow and that is regardless of human activity. Basically, we're not responsible for their extinction which means their extinction is yet another natural process of the Earth (and one could argue that even if it were human related then it would also be a natural process). It is arrogant to think we have a responsibility to do something about it. Now here we are trying to bring back animals from the dead and for nothing but our own self-righteous attitudes.

@StickCaveman I feel like a broken record when I keep explaining this... Around 12-25 species that are here today, won't be here...

I think it would be fun to bring animals back just for the sake of eating them. Who wouldn't want to dry dodo?

@StickCaveman Sure it'd be fun, but it's selfish.

Someone could argue that it's our moral obligation to bring species back like the Thylacine. They were hunted down and their whole species was purposely eradicated because everyone thought they were the one's preying on all the cattle and poultry, but they weren't.

Other points for would be it would be a great advancement in the field of genetic engineering, It could offer as important insights in things like evolution and the past, be a potential food source, benefit the tourism sector, threatened/damaged ecosystems could be restored with the aid of certain extinct species, particularly plants, like reduce invasive species .Though there other things to consider like if we could successfully re-introduce them to the ecosystem.

I agree with you in that it just another natural process, everything will die out eventually anyways. But if it does benefit humans, then maybe we should.

@PopsicleStick Someone could argue that it's our moral obligation to bring species back like the Thylacine. They were hunted down...

Fair points.. I just think it's as bad as taking an animal from the wild and forcing it to live in an environment it's not used to just because it's cute.

Like the slow loris for example... a few people see a YouTube video of one and it becomes a huge market. Slow lorises are taken from their natural environment, their teeth removed because they have a toxic bite, and are kept in very bright environments which aren't good at all for this nocturnal animal.

It depends, does the animal please us visually or practically? If so, then yes

drhannahs avatar drhannah Disagree 0Reply

I say no. No benefit to anyone by doing so. Especially the animal.

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