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What if you don't see colors the same as I do? Like maybe my red is your green, or something completely different from what I can imagine?

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LerrickSalass avatar People & Celebrities
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We can test for color blindness, and excluding those people, we all see orange as a shade away from red, and the rest of the rainbow's colors fade into the next shade. We all describe the same colors as dark, neon, pastel, light, etc. If we didn't all see the same colors, we couldn't test for color blindness. Make up tips like "use the color wheel to cancel out the red splotches on your skin by using a green base" wouldn't work. If my red was your black and my green was your silver, using silver to cancel out the effects of black doesn't work, and your face would have gray smudges under your eye that didn't match your skin color.

@Frank_n_Furter We can test for color blindness, and excluding those people, we all see orange as a shade away from red, and the...

Complimentary colors don't cancel each other out. For instance, subtractive colors give you more of a grayish dirt color when mixed and give you a vibrating contrast when put next to each other. Also, for additive light, black is not a color. It is the absence of light. So your concept of red = black doesn't work. Also for subtractive light, we see black because the tangible surface of the object absorbs all colors therefore we don't see any. The reason why we see green leaves is because it absorbs all the colors except green. The green bounce to our eyes so we see it as such.

@LerrickSalas Complimentary colors don't cancel each other out. For instance, subtractive colors give you more of a grayish dirt...

I felt ridiculous searching for this on the internet. I recall reading a fashion magazine in the waiting room at my boyfriend's doctor appointment talking about this.

www.today.com/style/6-secrets-i-learned-makeup-artist-school-1C8544335

"And when Sandler says 'unwanted color,' I immediately tune in because I want to learn how to cover up my zits, the stubborn redness around my nose, and the bluish hues under my eyes. She says opposite colors cancel each other out, so green-pigmented concealer covers redness, and orangey concealer removes blue. 'If you use your beige concealer, it'll only make those areas look muddy,' says Prior."

Hair bleach kits like Hot Topic's "White Out" come with a violet after treatment to counter the brassy effect bleaching your hair can have, colors opposite each other aren't not complimentary, but they don't not cancel each other out either.

Black isn't a color in physics because it's the non reflection of light waves. In terms of pigment, black is just as much a color as red. Your point about seeing leaves as green because we perceive the reflected colors is moot.

No offense intended, but a lot of what you've just said about color is irrelevant. You seem to at least know the terminology for the two different models of colors, so I'm curious as to why you're applying one set to an example that used the other.

@Frank_n_Furter I felt ridiculous searching for this on the internet. I recall reading a fashion magazine in the waiting room at my...

I guess you didn't catch my concept well. What my post meant about my red being different from yours is a change/shift in the hue scale. Let's take a hue/color slider for example. You are in red, and if you move that scale to the left/right you will get a different color. Noticed that the order of the colors didn't change. The order of colors on the spectrum remain the same. So, I'm saying that if my red is your black then your green should be my white. Not silver. In theory, yourmake up concept should work. Let me know if you need more clarifications.

@LerrickSalas I guess you didn't catch my concept well. What my post meant about my red being different from yours is a...

All you said was "maybe my red is your green, or something completely different from what I can imagine" (which, if your just shift the hue scale to where my green is your white, in what way would my green by something completely different than what you can imagine?) You didn't mention a hue/color slider and the order of the colors staying the same, so no, I did not catch that concept. Regardless, it still doesn't work. If everyone's colors were different but all the colors were still ordered the same like sliding a color scale, we wouldn't all be describing colors similarly. If my red is your black, you'd be very confused if I told you that red (black to you) was a potentially bright color. If my green is your white, you'd be very confused when I said that green (white to you) was a potentially light or dark color.

@Frank_n_Furter All you said was "maybe my red is your green, or something completely different from what I can imagine" (which, if...

Look, I only used one color as an example for a reason. I have no doubt that you are a very smart person. I understand that this will take a while to explain but when you see that light bulb lit, you'll be amaze! Okay, so if you say that your red(my black) is bright and your green(my white) is dark, then I will be confused. I have thought about this kind of questions before I posted this. Remember, if my colors have been different from yours since I was born, then my concept of bright/dark will be different as well. So it make sense that your red(my black) is considered "bright" because your bright is my dark. Do you get it now?

@LerrickSalas Look, I only used one color as an example for a reason. I have no doubt that you are a very smart person. I...

If everyone scale was just at a different place, the concepts of light and dark wouldn't be opposite. Starting with physical brightness: People's eyes don't function that differently- you'd be in room with no light and see dark. You'd be in a room with a bright white light and see light. No one sees light as black, it isn't a color. Every body's pupil function like that- we're not so different that some people see white when they're in a room with no lights.

From there, you would be able to apply the same concepts of brightness and darkness of light to colors. Let's use yellow. If you saw yellow and thought dark, it would seem weird that a color like that was called dark when you'd seen light, real, physical light, and yellow was the opposite end of the spectrum of that light. In fact, most or all the colors you thought of as dark were the opposite side of the spectrum from the light you saw. You'd also find it weird about how the same is true with the colors you call bright being on the other side of the spectrum. Talk to people about it at all ever, you're gonna find out there's people who see colors described as light to be on the same side of the spectrum as that light, and the colors described as dark being on the side of the spectrum of darkness.

There would be absolutely no evolutionary point in everyone seeing things so differently. We're all pretty similar in our make up. I can see people seeing slightly different shades of the same color because no one is ever built exactly the same. Scientist have studied the eye, and can tell how it picks up color. At some point, we'd probably would have seen people's eyes functioning differently outside of color blindness.

I've understood ever since you explained "my red being different from yours is a change/shift in the hue scale." Before then, I was under the impression you were saying people might just see different colors than each other with no rhyme or reason to it. My disagreement isn't because I don't understand you, it's because the logic you presented only focuses on one theoretical aspect that doesn't sufficiently take application to the real world into account.

@Frank_n_Furter If everyone scale was just at a different place, the concepts of light and dark wouldn't be opposite. Starting with...

I don't think you get it at all. You have presented interesting but contradicting statements. If you refer on my previous reply, I clearly stated that BLACK is not a color. Then you said, for pigments it is pretty much a color. And here you are again saying that it is NOT. I used red-black and green-white because I thought you'd understand it better since red-black is your example and I just change silver-white.

So do you agree that black is not a color? If you noticed, this is the reason why I said your example does NOT work. Let's change it up a bit. If you change red to blue then your green would be orange. So the idea of contrast and brightness should work. If red-yellow then green-violet. Now, you may say that, "Oh but yellow is BRIGHTER than red. So you'll be confuse if I said red is darker since you'll be seeing yellow." Now, this is just a matter of perception. Also, as you may already know, there are two types of colors. Additive and subtractive. For additive lights, yellow is not a pure color so therefore it is lighter but my perception of it would be different from yours. So it wouldn't necessarily mean that it is "brighter" unless if we put it next to a really darker color.

I agree with your claim that scientists have figure out some things about how the eye works. Example, we know dogs are color blind because they don't have cones, etc... But the knowledge about our perception of color is a different case. It is more subjective. Like you said, we see colors differently, your red is not the same as my red. It could be in a different shade. I took that idea about color theory and pushed it.

You said, "... the logic you presented only focuses on one theoretical aspect that doesn't sufficiently take application to the real world into account." Clearly, if you fully understood my concept you will see how ignorant your claim is.

Let me ask you, how do you interpret the idea I presented on my post? I want to see what you don't understand about it.

I can go on and on about color theory and the psychology of colors but I think it will be futile to do so just to make you understand.

@LerrickSalas I don't think you get it at all. You have presented interesting but contradicting statements. If you refer on my...

In light, it's not. In pigment, it is.

In my make up example, black is a pigment, thus a color. It still works. In my other example, about dark an light, I was talking about light as in photons, and that black is not a color in light.

Clearly if I understood your concept I would see how ignorant my claim is? You didn't even pick up that black is a color and also not a color depending on how you look at it and that I used two examples, one where it is a color, one where it is not. You completely missed out on the major point I made with that, which had to do with why your theory is not applicable to the real world. If someone went into a room with no lights on, they wouldn't perceive the room as being light. What they see when they see physical darkness and the darkness of a colors (that are actually light colors)would be opposite- while some people they would match up, physical darkness would look like it belonged on the same side of the spectrum as dark colors. "So it make sense that your red(my black) is considered "bright" because your bright is my dark." No, it doesn't. You can't accurately judge that my claim your theory is not applicable to the real world is ignorant when you didn't even get what I said.

The concept of people seeing different colors is not a difficult one. The idea that the color scale we see is in the same order but just the scale slid over is a new one, never heard it before, but not hard to understand. Let's just use ROY. G . BIV. I'll see red, you'll see green. I'll see orange, you'll see blue. I'll see yellow, you'll see indigo. I see green, you see violet. The colors you see go in the same order I see, but the scale is slid over. and that's why you think that if we had grown up with those colors, our concept of dark and light will be different. I have already explained why our concepts of which colors were light and which dark would not be different without us noticing, - and that is where you fixate on the one theory but don't consider the application of it to the real world making proving it false.

@LerrickSalas I don't think you get it at all. You have presented interesting but contradicting statements. If you refer on my...

Also, of course a color cannot be brightER without having another color to compare it to. There's a difference between a color being lighter than another color and a color just being classified as a light color.

I think they only way that could actually happen is if one of us was colorblind or on a very far out acid trip.

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