Does anybody think that its possible birds helped early humans to invent complex language?

TaNtricLuNarMoNkey3s avatar Animals & Nature
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What's the theory?

I think its quite possible there was a prehistoric version of Big Bird, 'Big Pteradactyl' who may have assisted early humans to communicate. "Jurassic Street is brought to you be the sound 'urrg' "

Possibly, but I think it highly unlikely.

You seem to. So at least one person.

Well apparently birds were the first recorded species to use complex language within the human epoch. You could say they pioneered it with us there to witness. Some birds will actually warn other creatures of danger and are constantly conversing. They have been known to use grammar and some birds are bilingual while others are not. It seems to me very likely that birds may have had the tool of language longer than us, and so maybe we took a bit of inspiration from them. Took a hint from the talking forest and what-not.

@TaNtricLuNarMoNkey3 Well apparently birds were the first recorded species to use complex language within the human epoch. You could say...

And you think it's possible for people to have made these observations before they knew what they were observing?

@dzmax And you think it's possible for people to have made these observations before they knew what they were observing?

You observe everything first before you know what it is you're observing. The earliest humans weren't necessarily any less intelligent than we are. And even an infant is affected in their development by what they merely observe before they have the mental discipline to apply the new information

@dzmax Yes, but, with no concept of grammar, how can one appreciate it?

even without applying the concept of grammar and knowing the language per say, if you spend some time in the forest you may notice that the crows only say "chey chey chey kah kah kah kah!".. or whatever when there is predator in the area. May take a long while longer to notice when they are gossiping about the scraps you are leaving by the fire and asking eachother if you're still tending it.

@dzmax That isn't the same as having an appreciation for grammar.

Birds asking questions isn't or birds relaying general warnings isn't? Isn't the same as whom having an appreciation? it is an easily observed example of language. And any example of something observed my a human being can go a long way. Whether your views on language are nativist (humans are born with a brain component that programs us to use and learn languages) or empiricist (We must have an example to teach us what language is) I think it is safe to say that if you were an early human still communicating non-verbaly, hearing anyone or anything else talk would engage your recognition of patterns and at least give you an inkling as to the effectiveness of and your own drive to use and understand language. I guess my main point is that it shouldn't be underestimated what nature has taught us beyond our innate set of developmental features as humans. We did not invent language, and every known language has roots in some earlier language or primordial communication method.

http://io9.com/5816441/birds-ar...to-use-grammar. Here you go anyone, think about this. Just ignore "first" part. We don't know that much about sea life language yet and so on

We have inherited and copied more than we are ready to admit !

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