Since Hydrogen (protons) were nearly all created just after the big bang - does this mean every hydrogen atom within us is 13.5 bn yrs old?

Just the astrophysics really - should be correct assumption as hydrogen (and helium) were the start point of all other elements then formed within stars. There must be a little hydrogen formed as a by product of atomic reactions (fission and fussion) but this I expect must be a tiny proportion of the total still left.

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I believe so, since matter cannot be created nor destroyed.

@Ethan I believe so, since matter cannot be created nor destroyed.

But that doesn't mean it doesn't take new forms.

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@But that doesn't mean it doesn't take new forms.

Are you saying that the matter in Hydrogen could move to be matter in, lets say, a magnesium atom?

@Ethan Are you saying that the matter in Hydrogen could move to be matter in, lets say, a magnesium atom?

I didn't realize I'd pressed anon on that o.O

I'm not sure about the real world application of your example, I never really excelled at chemistry because it was incredibly boring unless applied to something I found interesting. An example would be the nuclear reaction of the sun's hydrogen atoms to helium.

Technically speaking, you are correct. Hydrogen is formed by the fission of larger atoms. However, I doubt this is "hydrogen" in the sense that we most commonly know it as. I'd guess that most hydrogen we "produce" is the isotope known as "tritium".

well, i don't think hydrogen reproduces so that pretty much sums it up.

No hydrogen atoms, along with all other elements are produced in stars too

Pretty much.

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