Could the findings at the LHC regarding the speed of neutrinos someday support the idea that quantum mechanics can operate on a larger scale

The search for a "theory of everything" that ties together all known physical phenomena has the major hurdle of unifying Einstein's theories of relativity and quantum mechanics.

At the LHC in Switzerland, scientists have observed neutrinos traveling at speeds faster than the speed of light, and have more recently re-run the test (eliminating a potential source of error) only to arrive at the same results. The implications of a particle that travels faster than the speed of light include refuting Einstein's theory of special relativity, opening the possibility of traveling back in time, and muddling the principles of cause and effect.

Now for my question: assuming that these findings prove to be accurate, could the existence of faster than light neutrinos coupled with Aaron O'Connell's experimentation support quantum mechanics (or some further evolved version) as a "unifying theory" which could predict the outcome of any theoretical experimentation? Aaron O'Connell's experiment demonstrates that visible objects can act in a quantum way. Does this mean that the ability of quantum particles to travel faster than the speed of light will also someday translate to macro-objects?

From what I can gather about Aaron O'Connell's talk, he is proposing that quantum mechanics can operate on a larger scale, which has always been the realm of Einstein's theories. Now evidence may exist which refutes aspects of Einstein's principle theories. Could quantum mechanics someday not only explain electromagnetism, strong nuclear force, and weak nuclear force, but the fourth fundamental interaction of nature, gravity, if the current theory we have for gravity is found to falter? And how might Aaron O'Connell's experiment tie into this?

I would appreciate any insights, opinons, or criticisms.

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