Is gravity a result of mass or size?

When I was in highschool, we were taught that gravitational force was a result of ridiculous amounts of mass. Like the sun. That high mass meant higher gravitational pull.

But then, I started learning about space time (which I don't fully grasp yet, to be honest)... I learned that gravity is a function of curves or dips in the surface of space time, and that objects in a gravitational field are really just circling around the toilet bowl of a very large piece of whatever.

The issue is, wouldn't that mean that gravity is a result of SIZE (as in, how great a dip it makes in space-time) as opposed to MASS?

Any resources to help me understand would be GREATLY appreciated.

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Don't get me started on gravity

I don't think it's directly a result of either, but it correlates to mass not size. Greater mass would create a bigger "dip" in the "surface" of space-time as you described it, size wouldn't. Think of it as a sheet being held up between four people. Which would make it dip more, a heavy rock or a light but large beach ball?

@raintrail I don't think it's directly a result of either, but it correlates to mass not size. Greater mass would create a...

I agree and here's another example: The existence of black holes demonstrates that mass, not size is the thing bending space/time.

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