What’s the oldest thing you own?

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I have portraits of my grandparents that are over 100 years old and a handmade baby dress of mine from 1947. I also have a framed watercolor and hand-embroidered cottage scene that was made for my grandma back in the 40's.

I have some old coins, mid to late 1800's.

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@2562360

Stop your calls, we have a winner.

Well, there are some stuff from my grandpa. There is a small horse statue and a little sphere with a Saint George picture in it. They might be the oldest things. But I don't know how old they are and no one else in my family seems to know either.
Anyway, there are other old stuff of knowable age, so let me mention them too:
There is a 28 year old shelf (with various compartments to put TV and other stuff), but it's a kind of screwed up by time and use.
There is also a fan that is a bit younger than the shelf (26 years old). It's still working well, and is heavily used during summer.

I have an original copy that I found in an old house in Tasmania called The History Of France. It was written and published in 1805. Napoleon is still the Emperor. It's an amazing read if you're interested in that kind of history especially as it was written at the time.

I also have a half dime from 1851 that they found under a threshold in my 100+ year old house.

I have a Coleman "gasoline lantern" from 1935. As I understand it, back then, gasoline was produced by a different process and was similar to Coleman fuel in that it would evaporate without leaving any deposits, unlike modern gasoline which tends to leave deposits which clog Coleman appliances.

At around the same time, an inventor came up with a carburetor that evaporated the fuel before adding it to the engine, allowing a Ford Model A to get 200 mpg as tested by Ford. Coincidentally, not long after that, fuel companies switched from the surface skim method of fuel production to the catalytic method. Besides making a form of gasoline that doesn't evaporate cleanly, it enabled them to get considerably more fuel from each barrel of oil, which was their stated reason for making the change.

I have a couple of joiner planes from the 1800's. Some of my grandfathers coins.
I also found a petrified wasps nest, only about 2" across. I have no clue how old it is.

I have some Widow's Mite bronze coins that are over 2000 years old.

a chinese antiqure, small table top with storage below

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