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If socialized medicine is so good, then why are there so many stories about people living in countries where there is socialized medicine, coming to the US for treatment?

@PhilboydStudge Conversely, if socialized medicine is so bad, then why are there so few people who would trade their healthcare...

In addition to the article below, New Zealand does not provide medical care to non citizens. Think how much cheaper ours could be if we eliminated paying for 12,000,000 illegals.

New Zealand residents have the highest levels of anxiety about health care of any OECD country surveyed: 42% of New Zealanders feared they wouldn’t be able to afford medical care in the event of illness, 38% worried they would be forced to wait too long for non-emergency care, 38% believed they won’t get advanced care if they become seriously ill. 6

• In 1998 one out of every four 7 and in 2001 8 one out of every seven New Zealand residents reported going without needed health care due to costs. In the same study, one out of every five US residents, one out of every 10 Australian residents, one out of every 12 Canadian residents and one out of every 25 UK residents reported going without needed health care due to costs.

• In 2001 11% of New Zealand adults reported it was very or extremely difficult to see a specialist when needed. In the same study 17% of US adults, 16 % of Canadians, 13% of Britons and 12% of Australians complained of difficulty seeing a specialist. 47% of New Zealand patients reported that costs posed a barrier to specialist care. In comparison 49% of US residents, 33% of Australian residents and 5% of Canadian and UK residents reported a cost barrier to specialist care. Canadian and UK residents were more likely to report long waiting times posing a barrier to specialist care (41% and 46% respectively).

Waiting Times (2001 Data): 9

• 69% of New Zealand patients reported being able to see their doctor the same day. In comparison 62% of Australian patients, 42% of UK patients, 36% of US patients and 35% of Canadian patients were able to see their doctor the same day.

• 43% of New Zealand patients reported waiting one month or less for elective surgery. In comparison 63% of US patients, 51% of Australian patients, 38% of UK patients and 37% of Canadian patients waited one month or less for elective surgery.

• 26% of New Zealand patients reported waiting four months or more for elective surgery. In comparison 38% of UK patients, 27% of Canadian patients, 23% of Australian patients and 5% of US patients waited four months or more.

http://www.pnhp.org/news/2003/j...aland_heal.php

What is really sad is that the parental rights were denied - common under socialism. The parents raised the money to bring the child to the US, worked with the doctor, but both the British Court and EU Court determined that they (the Courts) and the bureaucrats knew what was best for the child.

There are always multiple sides to a story, but being a parent I cannot imagine any court ruling denying my right to take my sick child to another country to receive treatment he cannot get in my own country. The only courts that should have a say in whether or not the Gards are able to travel to the U.S. are U.S. courts.

so very very sad, and infuriating

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