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All southern statues and/or monuments on American soil that remind us of slavery and racism must be torn down.

It is offensive.

Image for post All southern statues and/or monuments on American soil that remind us of slavery and racism must be torn down.
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I think it's a matter for local communities to decide. History can be very offensive, embarrassing, and regrettable, but I don't think it should be censored. It smacks of book burning.

Leave the monuments alone.
History is not offensive.

Budwicks avatar Budwick Disagree +4Reply

Take them off the streets? Sure. There's History Museums for a reason. Put them inside one. But get rid of them, as in destroying it, in an attempt to erase history? Unless you intend to take a picture of the statue before destroying it, and put the pictures in a museum, I don't think that's a smart move. Forgetting their existence is a very bad idea. Never forget History. That will backfire, horribly. We already repeat mistakes and do horrible things even knowing the consequences. Can you imagine not knowing them at all? We're already fucked-up as we are. Let's not add "we didn't know better" on that.

I don't see any reason for taking them down, they are a part of history....they've been there for years and I'm wondering why now, why is there such a big fuss about them now?

@StarzAbove I don't see any reason for taking them down, they are a part of history....they've been there for years and I'm...

Because there are racist/extremist groups attempting to impose their will and agendas and using the statues and other items as a pawn/excuses in all of this. sad smilie

But it's not the item itself... it's what the item represents...
And what does the item represent?

What ever great or horrible thing they can create in the minds of their people because represents is all about interpretation... and you can make an interpretation to fit your agenda.

Zolfies avatar Zolfie Disagree +2Reply

Leave history alone, it's not oppression, it's simply a record of past events, even the horrible ones, this is not how humanity prospers, not with censorship of history because of some butt hurt pansies.

This feeling driven tolerant but intolerant agenda these die hard liberals are pushing will be the death of your nation. Nothing in it's extreme is good, universe requires a balance. Just because a bunch of hateful rainbow colored people brand anything they dislike as hate doesn't mean its ture

How dare you suggest that a statue of Booker T Washington be torn down?

Only statues of white Confederate generals should be torn down because they are evil, pro slavery, and racist.

Booker T. Washington was the most famous black man in America between 1895 and 1915. He was also considered the most influential black educator of the late 19th and early 20th centuries insofar as he controlled the flow of funds to black schools and colleges. Born a slave on a small farm in the Virginia backcountry, he worked in the salt furnaces and coalmines of West Virginia as a child. Determined to educate himself, he traveled hundreds of miles under great hardship until he arrived -- broke, tired, and dirty -- at Hampton Institute.

"In all things that are purely social we can be as separate as the finger, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress."

He became a star pupil under the tutelage of General Samuel Chapman Armstrong, head of Hampton. Washington was teaching at Hampton when General Armstrong called him aside after chapel. He said he had received a letter from some "gentlemen in Alabama" asking him to recommend a white principal for a colored school they wanted to open there in the town of Tuskegee. In 1881, Washington founded Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute on the Hampton model in the Black Belt of Alabama. Booker T. Washington
Starting with a broken down building, he used his ability to win the trust of white Southerners and Northern philanthropists to make Tuskegee into a model school of industrial education. He reassured whites that nothing in his educational program challenged white supremacy or offered economic competition with whites. He accepted racial subordination as a necessary evil, at least until such time as blacks could prove themselves worthy of full civil and political rights. As far as blacks were concerned, Washington insisted that industrial education would enable them to lift themselves up by their bootstraps and escape the trap of sharecropping and debt.

In September 1895, Washington became a national hero. Invited to speak at the 1895 Cotton States and International Exposition in Atlanta, Washington publicly accepted disfranchisement and social segregation as long as whites would allow black economic progress, educational opportunity, and justice in the courts. "The wisest of my race understand that the agitation of questions of social equality is the extremest folly and that progress in the enjoyment of all the privileges that will come to us must be the result of severe and constant struggle rather than artificial forcing. The opportunity to earn a dollar in a factory just now is worth infinitely more than to spend a dollar in an opera house."

Washington further publicized himself and his program by publishing his (ghost-written) autobiography, UP FROM SLAVERY, in 1901. He also founded the National Negro Business League in 1900. Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, both men with deep racial prejudices, used Washington as an advisor because he accepted racial subordination. He was able to recommend candidates for minor political posts that traditionally were given to blacks. The industrialists who controlled the financing of many black schools in the South depended upon his advice as to which schools should receive funds. In 1903, Washington's policies received a challenge from within the black community. W.E.B. Du Bois, then a scholar at Atlanta University, attacked Washington's philosophy in the book THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK.

Media Feature - Watch the Video An organized resistance to Washington grew within the black intellectual community. But as far as the majority of middle-class and working-class blacks were concerned, Washington remained their man. His popularity enabled him to neutralize criticism, sometimes by devious means such as bribing newspapers to report false and unflattering reports of his critics. Because of his image as a conciliator, Washington seldom could publicly criticize injustice. Yet, behind the scenes, he did finance court cases challenging segregation and tried to mitigate some of its excesses. When Woodrow Wilson became president in 1913, Washington lost his influence in the federal government, which Wilson helped segregate further. Meanwhile, a new era had begun in the black community, and a younger generation would no longer accept white supremacy. Under the leadership of Du Bois and others, they would demand their political and civil rights.

@Bookyanka How dare you suggest that a statue of Booker T Washington be torn down? Only statues of white Confederate...

Just the whites, eh?
Well, at least you're not a racist.
But wait - you kind of are!

Budwicks avatar Budwick Disagree +2Reply
@Budwick Just the whites, eh? Well, at least you're not a racist. But wait - you kind of are!

Bud, I don't know what to tell you, I have never seen such delusion and brainwashing in any of my 22 young years on Earth...

@Budwick I feel the same at 67 my young friend. This mass hysteria is getting kind of scary.

This is getting out of hand Bud, it's all violence under the delusion of justice, this is well organized...

@Sunny_the_skeptic This is getting out of hand Bud, it's all violence under the delusion of justice, this is well organized...

So it seems. But, who could be behind all this community organizing? Who could have the influence, connections, money? Who could such a community organizer be?

Budwicks avatar Budwick Disagree 0Reply
@Sunny_the_skeptic Bud, I don't know what to tell you, I have never seen such delusion and brainwashing in any of my 22 young years on...

Sunny - I think we've been fooled. Book was I believe being sarcastic. Take a peek at my new post on Harvard and see his comment. We may have misjudged him.

Budwicks avatar Budwick Disagree +1Reply
@Bookyanka How dare you suggest that a statue of Booker T Washington be torn down? Only statues of white Confederate...

Jesus tap dancing chirst you're so brainwashed, you've bought into the victim mind of the new age liberal so hard you believe anything they throw at you, your judgment of evil and good is based on race and privilege..... I always thought such things were exaggerations...

1) If you destroy history then people won't learn from it... and then people will try to deny it ever happened (like a few groups deny that the holocaust ever happened)

2) If we destroy all that remind us of slavery and racism then we must destory all the positives ones as well, which include all Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr. and so many other positives one... why? because they do remind us of slavery because they're extremely well known for speaking of the issue.

3) If you just run from what you're scared of, it then becomes stronger.

So I think this is a horrible idea.

Zolfies avatar Zolfie Disagree +1Reply

Poor wording, but the statues erected for confederate leaders need to go. They belong in history books, not on pedestals. We should be putting forth positive monuments, not just "hey kids, don't forget this guy existed".

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