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If I give one rich family 100 pumpkins and I give 49 middle-class families zero pumpkins each, then the average family gets 2 pumpkins, that's a lot of pie! Welcome to the Trump tax plan - it a fair plan for the average family.

Image for post If I give one rich family 100 pumpkins and I give 49 middle-class families zero pumpkins each, then the average family gets 2 pumpkins, that's a lot of pie!  Welcome to the Trump tax plan - it a fair plan for the average family.
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VicZincs avatar Law
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Out of the 49 pumpkins you give the middle class, how many are going to actually be made into a pie? How many pumpkins you give the average family will be made into pies?
Since you are giving away these pumpkins, somebody had to initially pay for ALL of them. More than likely, it was the top 10% you always whine about.

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@2681505

Nor is cutting taxes

Poor Vic. Everybody's wise to his progressive mumbo jumbo.

Budwicks avatar Budwick Disagree +3Reply

Take it easy on those wealthy people Vic. I'm sure they deserve all the pumpkins they can get their tiny little hands on..

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@PhilboydStudge Take it easy on those wealthy people Vic. I'm sure they deserve all the pumpkins they can get their tiny little...

If there is one "constant" in all of this, it is that anyone with a computer can portray things as they want them to appear, and people will believe what they want to believe.

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@JustJimColo If there is one "constant" in all of this, it is that anyone with a computer can portray things as they want them...

It doesn't even take a computer. wink smilie

I agree. This can get quite philosophical. How do any of us really know what is happening with the things we don't personally experience ourselves? We read, watch TV news, and Google, but none of us really know.

In this case I have yet to see information to the contrary. If I do that may make me change my suspicions, but until then this is what I got.

@PhilboydStudge It doesn't even take a computer. I agree. This can get quite philosophical. How do any of us really...

There are rich people and there are poor people in every country in the world. Always have been, and always will be. It's even worse in the socialist countries that some nut cases on here would like us to become.

I'm far from wealthy. I'm "comfortable" but it's because I've worked for it. Why should I give up the comfort level I've achieved after 50 years or work, to those who don't work at all? (Some people on here claim to be very wealthy but that's probably BS as well. I know some very wealthy people and none of them have time to spend most of their time on social media)

@JustJimColo There are rich people and there are poor people in every country in the world. Always have been, and always will...

Your financial situation sounds similar to mine - four years of college and 32 years of professional work (and counting). I worked my ass off in college and continued to do so for decades.

I believe being born into a middle-class family in the U.S. was a huge advantage to those born to poorer families. Had I not won the parent sweepstakes I would probably be much less comfortable.

That's why I support providing as many people as possible with the same opportunities I had when growing up. It's probably obvious from the ambiguity of that statement that I do not know how to achieve this.
Hopefully someone can break this Gordian Knot.

If things keep going they way they have been I fear we may end up with an economy with 5% owning almost everything while the rest of us own doodley-squat.

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@PhilboydStudge Your financial situation sounds similar to mine - four years of college and 32 years of professional work (and...

Phil, I grew up in a poor family with no prospects in a small town. I did what almost ANYONE else could do. I joined the military. I got money from the Viet Nam GI bill, got out of the army and went to college, while working a part time job during school and a full time in the Summer. Later, after working in the job market a few years, I went back to college and decided to get commissioned and make the military my career.
Granted, the military isn't for everyone, and I really wasn't loving life as a private, but I saw that a wanted a better life than what would be handed to me. I made the sacrifices by going in as an enlisted soldier. I later went on and got a couple advanced degrees for a later civilian career.
I guess that's one of the reasons I don't buy into the whole notion that those who don't have anything, can't make something of their lives, can't afford to go to college, can't do this or can't do that.
Anyone CAN achieve their goals if they are willing to make the necessary sacrifices. Excuses are a dime a dozen. When I went to officer basic, there were guys like me and there were guys born with a silver spoon in their mouth who went to Georgetown, Yale and other big schools. The day we got there, there wasn't one bit of difference between us. We were also all the same color. Green.

@JustJimColo Phil, I grew up in a poor family with no prospects in a small town. I did what almost ANYONE else could do. I...

JJ. I don't remember ever knowing that you had served in the military. Thank you for your sacrifices. (Though I respected you before..) you have it my utmost respect.

It seems you've played the hand you were dealt deftly, and succeeded through determination. I understand why you would feel the way you do about well-bodied people who are not working.

My story is not nearly as compelling. I Grew up in a 1,300 sq ft house in a post-WWII suburb of Buffalo, NY. with three sisters and two alcoholic parents. My dad was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder but refused treatment because he didn't want to give up drinking. If you've ever known anyone with BPD you know how much fun that can be.

I was a lackluster student in High School, and my parents actually discouraged me from going to college because. They didn't think I had what it takes I guess.

I excelled at art but didn't want to work as a commercial artist. Like many, I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life, and after graduating I just worked full-time at a Pizza Hut. That was a great learning experience for me. It motivated me to give college a try. I worked at part-time jobs through H.S. and college.

I am proud of what I have accomplished so far, but feel that while I busted my tail to get where I am, a lot of luck was involved. For example, my next door neighbor's dad gave me some timely encouragement (to go to college). I also had parents providing me with food, shelter, transportation, etc. Consequently I feel that my life could have gone in a completely different direction had it not been through some dumb luck. That is why I am okay with supporting people who need (temporary) help. That and I am a bleeding heart.

@PhilboydStudge JJ. I don't remember ever knowing that you had served in the military. Thank you for your sacrifices. (Though I...

Sounds like we had similar obstacles to overcome growing up. Your Dad had some issues, while mine had severe brain dame from a car accident when I was 11. You were a lackluster student in HS while I was permanently kicked out my sophomore year. The only positive during that time was my Mom who worked 2 jobs to keep us with a roof over our heads and I can say I never went hungry. (She only had an 8th grade education since she was forced to stay home and work on the farm during the depression.)
I don't cal it dumb luck Phil. I call it resolve to do what needed to be done to better our lives.
I don't mind giving people in need a hand "up". I'm against giving people who have made receiving "hand outs" a lifestyle they feel they are entitled to.
Sounds like we may be ideologically pretty different but we both put in the hard work to get where we are today. <s>

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