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I always sleep on my left side

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That would depend on numerous factors.

@Piper2 ?

You're tryin' to "rile" me. smile smilie

@FuzzyPeach You're tryin' to "rile" me.

Not at all. The left or right side of an area, would vary depending on where and in which direction one is sleeping.

@FuzzyPeach That's the whole silly point, and there's no real answer.

Of course there isn't. IF I was sleeping where I most commonly do though, I would be facing what I consider the left side of the room. Unless of course, I wasn't sleeping with my head at the foot of the foot of the bed. The possibilities are just about endless! biggrin smilie

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I sleep on my chest

I sleep on Sunny's chest as well.

@Sunny_the_skeptic I was told I snore a lot.

Well, you whine a lot in your sleep. Makes my sleeping difficult. Also, I bet you are planning to pull a tooth from me in your sleep some night.

@ZonkeyBalls Well, you whine a lot in your sleep. Makes my sleeping difficult. Also, I bet you are planning to pull a tooth from...

You will be so knocked out by the booze it will make the tooth extraction so easy, it's like a powerful anesthetic.

@Sunny_the_skeptic Not until I get my diploma I'm not.

How hard can that be... I can write you one right now. Just give me an address to send it to.

@Sunny_the_skeptic If diplomas for medical professionals are faked then may god help us all.

I can drill your teeth. I know most of the pain killers and how/where to put them. I have been a patient many times. It's just roots and cavities and inserting medication (you might not know this, but here in Finland, they always tell things aloud - "I'm using this and this now... Okay... Let's put this inside and see, if I can do the root canal with this or do I need more of the stuff..." Being a patient is quite a learning experience, as long as you listen to your doctor.

@ZonkeyBalls I can drill your teeth. I know most of the pain killers and how/where to put them. I have been a patient many...

It's not as simple as you think, in order for them to even let you near a real patient you must know tooth anatomy in and out, every blood vessel, every nerve every layer of the tooth and specific shapes of cavities that not end up getting the tooth fractured due to the effects of the occlusal pressure. We're just starting but there is a crap ton of stuff you need to know in order to make this work, everyone can pull out a tooth or drill a hole but what use if you don't know how and why.

@Sunny_the_skeptic It's not as simple as you think, in order for them to even let you near a real patient you must know tooth anatomy...

The anatomy of a tooth is unique for each and every patient. Mine have three long roots. In fact, they are so long and well-attached, that a piece of my jaw bone broke off, when my "wisdom teeth" were being pulled out. 95 percent of the stuff is general knowledge, but getting ready for that five percent that is different in each case, it's... Impossible.

I know the drill types they use and I wouldn't go in - head first - with the tiny one, that's for precision drilling, right? Not that I had any precision in the first place, but who needs a tongue... It's first the grinder, if the tooth is still mostly intact. Then you gradually go for the tiny part, obviously taking the patient's needs in concern - that usually didn't happen in my youth. I create a lot of saliva in my mouth. For the teeth, that is a good thing. For breathing, that is not a good thing.

You drill enough to see the roots, you stick in that silly root canal stuff, whatever, three or four patches, put some "concrete" (so to speak) and then just shave off the excessive bits, until it fits nicely. Am I right or wrong?

@ZonkeyBalls The anatomy of a tooth is unique for each and every patient. Mine have three long roots. In fact, they are so long...

Each bit of the drill is designed to create a specific opening, first of all you wont know from what angle even to drill, you barely see anything and the slightest movement might cause a HUGE problem for you. Root canal treatment is for dead teeth, the dead ones are very easy to fracture since they get demineralized over time, tooth enamel is not that easy to drill and some people are delicate enough to start squirming even before you reach the dentin.

On the other hand you need to protect the tongue and constantly suck out the saliva that would otherwise make it hard for you to create the cavity or place medicine.

Overall you barely see the tooth especially if it's one of the last, yet you need to be very careful and you need to control the depth, for cavities the reason we have to make certain shaped holes is because each material is different, it either expands or it shrinks, it bonds easily or hard and you need to make it fill a shape it wont fall out of and yet make the walls thick with enough dentin under them so that the average 100kg of pressure made by 3 of your skull's muscles doesn't fracture your tooth. And to top it all off if you extract a tooth from an old man who lied about drinking aspirin good luck stopping the bleeding, there is a reason we turn back patients who drink medicine that stops clothing.

@Sunny_the_skeptic Each bit of the drill is designed to create a specific opening, first of all you wont know from what angle even to...

Damn, you are good.

I have had some dead teeth. Just fracturing off, while biting a pizza or something, no feeling, since the nerves weren't connected to anything anymore. On the other had, I have very sensitive nerves between some of my 4/5, 13/14 area and my nose. I believe it's quite normal, actually, to have cojoined nerves?

@ZonkeyBalls Damn, you are good. I have had some dead teeth. Just fracturing off, while biting a pizza or something, no...

What are those numbers you're using? In Bulgaria we use the Viola formula where you mark 4 sides of the jaws 1=upper right 2=upper left 3=lower left 4=lower right and then from 1 to 8 for each of the 8 teeth on each quadrant eg. 13, 14 are upper right canine and first premolar.

As for the nerves the're all coming from the same place, the nerves that innervate the upper teeth are called plexus dentalis superior which come from the maxillary branch of the facial nerve. So if a specific tooth is painful and not the whole row it's either the nerve itself or the tooth. I'm not that knowledgeable about the nerves yet, all of them just split to more and more branches till you have no fucking clue anymore, there's no way to tell without examination.

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