Can a property owner or business owner be sued by someone who slips on the ice and gets hurt when the entire town is covered with it?

There is 3/4 of an inch on all pavement in Hornell, N.Y., this being the first business day after the big storm. Nobody has been hurt on my property; I've just always wondered.

Image for post Can a property owner or business owner be sued by someone who slips on the ice and gets hurt when the entire town is covered with it?
73% Yes 18% No 0% It depends on: 9% Other
JerryHendricksons avatar Law
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@2712534

Yes, I should have said "successfully sue."

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@2712535

It's kind of hard to clear an entire parking lot of ice. Well, nobody here has done it and they had all weekend. I treated and removed it in main traffic areas but no way am I covering all pavement with salt. AND it's been so cold that the salt won't even melt the ice. I've had to throw sand on top.

If a drunk driver can sue a bar for serving him too many drinks, and if a trespasser's family can sue a homeowner when she drowns in their pool, then I would guess one can sue a property owner for slipping on any snow/ice on their property. It's beyond ridiculous.

I once heard that if there's only one lawyer in town, she'll never have work, but if there are two lawyers in town, they'll have as much work as they want.

Yeah in theory you can sue for anything and everything. Can you win if a different story. But I've heard of a case where a mail person sued (and winning) because they broke their ankle when their cut through someone's yard and stepped into depression.

But a lot of cities (at least in the North) have laws were the public walk ways (sidewalks and all) need to be cleared and safely walk-able by a certain time... and if someone has an accident they whomever was suppose to clean it, is at fault. This is why a number of people fight hard, to not have sidewalks put in on their properties... if a city is attempting to expand their sidewalks.

Also if you take the snow (including from your driveway) and put it into the street, that's also illegal and people can be fined (or arrested).

I believe in my city, a person has 24 hours to clean their walks after a storm.

@JustJimColo I believe in my city, a person has 24 hours to clean their walks after a storm.

The man lives in a reasonable city. The problem is that sometimes it will melt a little and freeze over again.

I dont know if they can but it's stupid, if that is fair then people should sue the state for slipping in public property. Such things are so weird to me, in my country you just walk it off.

I'm just guessing - Yes.

@Budwick I'm just guessing - Yes.

If true, that's a shame. I mean, there a places in Alaska that basically ARE ice.

@JerryHendrickson If true, that's a shame. I mean, there a places in Alaska that basically ARE ice.

Society is just so triggered, ready to sue. It's sad.
A homeowner in Cleveland a few years back I recall had cleared the sidewalks in front of his house. He didn't get it all, there was still some snow packed down. It got slippery, someone fell and got hurt. He was sued and told by police - that he made it worse by clearing the snow as he did.

People suck.

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