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Spanish
Alvaro Soler - Sofia (xD Had to post this one): YouTube video thumbnail
Alvaro Soler - Puebla: YouTube video thumbnail

Sofias avatar Sofia Agree +6Reply
@Sofia Spanish Alvaro Soler - Sofia (xD Had to post this one): Alvaro Soler - Puebla:...

I guess there isn't that much difference between Spanish and Portuguese, which obviously is your native language? The structure and a lot of the words are pretty much the same?

@ZonkeyBalls I guess there isn't that much difference between Spanish and Portuguese, which obviously is your native language?...

The writing is very similar. How you say it, though, that's where most of the changes come from.

I didn't actually study Spanish (well, I did for one month, then I changed to Maths), but I can't remember a time where I didn't understand some of it. The thing is, most Spanish people don't understand Portuguese. I don't get why, but while Portuguese can grasp most Spanish, and some French and Italian, they have a hard time understanding us back.

Sofias avatar Sofia Agree +1Reply
@Sofia The writing is very similar. How you say it, though, that's where most of the changes come from. I didn't actually...

How different is the Brazilian version of your language? Do you consider it as a mere dialect or is there more to it?

@ZonkeyBalls How different is the Brazilian version of your language? Do you consider it as a mere dialect or is there more to it?

It's extremely similar, more since they reformed some of the writing rules in Portugal in the recent years. But the accents are different. It's almost the same thing as with the other countries: we can understand them easily, but not all of them can understand us.

... it became apparent that there were differences between the spellings being used in the two countries. Even though both were based on the same general principles, phonetic differences between European Portuguese and Brazilian Portuguese had led to divergent spellings in some cases. Various attempts were made in the remainder of the 20th century to bring the two orthographies closer to each other, sometimes with modest success, other times without success. To this day, they do not coincide completely.
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R...an_orthography

Sofias avatar Sofia Agree +2Reply
@Sofia It's extremely similar, more since they reformed some of the writing rules in Portugal in the recent years. But the...

Actually, I have been playing around with the idea of learning both Spanish and Portuguese, but as a foreigner, it's quite easy to make mistakes, so... Which one is easier? If you can put yourself in my position...

Italian
Tiziano Ferro - Ti Scatterò Una Foto: YouTube video thumbnail
Marco Mengoni - Ti Ho Voluto Bene Veramente: YouTube video thumbnail

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@2810614

Ah, I know that one :D

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@2810628

This was always one of those songs that I know, but I couldn't name it xD

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French
Stromae - Quand C'est: YouTube video thumbnail
Stromae - Tous Les Mêmes: YouTube video thumbnail
Mozart Opera Rock - Le bien qui fait mal: YouTube video thumbnail
Christophe Maé - Dingue, Dingue, Dingue: YouTube video thumbnail

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I can't really name any, off the top of my head..

If it has a good beat...I'll like it.

Probably won't learn any of the language, unless it's a copy of a song I already know in English.

@JanHaskell

Aaaaaaaaaargh, Janis!

I was supposed to make the weird Japanese music video post!

@ZonkeyBalls Aaaaaaaaaargh, Janis! I was supposed to make the weird Japanese music video post!

Believe it or not, that was a very popular song back in the early 60's. I still like it! a smilie

@ZonkeyBalls That's an unfair advantage. I wasn't even born yet!

Hey, let me have this one ... it's one of the few advantages of being born in the 40's! hehe smilie

@JanHaskell Hey, let me have this one ... it's one of the few advantages of being born in the 40's!

Okay... This time.

But watch your back, sistah, 'cause the storm is rising.

Well... I guess I have to go with this, as well...

YouTube video thumbnail

Not a song, but a lot of Finnish in the background. Also, rubbing the nose of our Canadian and US friends, at the same time.

YouTube video thumbnail

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@2810698

Stop doping yourself with bath salts. You are an old man, after all. And don't put my name on your testament, I don't want fifteen hundred cats.

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@2810770

I remember this one. I always thought J-Lo should've sing in Spanish.

2:18... Damn, I miss home.

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@2810766

Portuguese and Spanish? I like it :D

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@JanHaskell

Hahahah xD I have three Italian co-workers and today we were singing this :D

Sofias avatar Sofia Agree +4Reply

Here is a Dutch one:

(Boudewijn de Groot has a lot of great ones, but this is my favorite one.)

YouTube video thumbnail

Lyrics: http://www.dutchsongs.overtuin....t-vlinder.html

@primeiro Here is a Dutch one: (Boudewijn de Groot has a lot of great ones, but this is my favorite...

Do they have a lot of curling of the tongue in Dutch, or it's just how he says it?

I don't know this one. I like it :D

Sofias avatar Sofia Agree +1Reply
@Sofia Do they have a lot of curling of the tongue in Dutch, or it's just how he says it? I don't know this one. I like it :D

Yep, that R sound is common in Dutch. But (from the very little I know) it depends: some people pronounce all the R's sort of Spanish-like as in that song, but some R's can be like the French R or the American English "arrrrrr", depending on the speaker and the position of the R in the word.

Good, glad you liked it. :)

@primeiro Yep, that R sound is common in Dutch. But (from the very little I know) it depends: some people pronounce all the...

Ah, in Portugal our R's are a mix of Spanish and Russian. If it's just one R, it's like Spanish, if it's two, it's like Russian. (Now I'm trying to think if it's the same in Brazil xD)

Sofias avatar Sofia Agree +1Reply
@Sofia Ah, in Portugal our R's are a mix of Spanish and Russian. If it's just one R, it's like Spanish, if it's two, it's...

In Brazil (in Rio) it's similar - when it's one, it's like Spanish, and when it's two it's more like French. :)

In other parts of the Rio de Janeiro state (apart from the city of Rio de Janeiro, which is where I live), and also in São Paulo, when the R is at the end of the word (or before consonants), it sounds like the American English R. :P

@StarzAbove

I love this one. So lovely.

Sofias avatar Sofia Agree +2Reply
@Sofia I love this one. So lovely.

I agree, I'm a Josh Groban fan, I was fortunate to see his concert a year ago when he was in town.

One thing about language is that different dialects are sometimes difficult to understand, even if you live in the same country. I believe people much brighter than myself have estimated that in China, there are at least 300 different dialects and some of the people have no idea, what the other one is saying in their own dialect.

I didn't think this would be a problem in such a small country as Finland, but... After I played some music to a then co-worker of mine, he said he didn't understand, what was said in the song. I said, that's the south-east dialect, only put on the songs with a very heavy way, to distinct them from the other bands. He just didn't get it. He was born in the western part of Finland, grew up there, and I doubt he never even visited the eastern part of the country.

Anyways, just as Finnish wouldn't be enough torture... Here's that dialect I mentioned about:

YouTube video thumbnail

@ZonkeyBalls One thing about language is that different dialects are sometimes difficult to understand, even if you live in the...

That happens between Portugal (the Continent) and the Islands. They tend to put subtitles when someone of the Islands is on the TV.

Sofias avatar Sofia Agree +3Reply
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