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This is why the continents' shorelines match, amirite?

Science tells us the earth was originally formed as molten rock. Then as it cooled, a crust formed on the surface. Cracks developed in the crust as it cooled further, creating a series of continental plates that still exist today. Eventually water began to condense and as it accumulated, it filled in the cracks, forming the first oceans.

Are we on the same page so far?

Okay, so here's the part they don't talk about: space debris. There are a lot of rocks and dust floating around in space, we're constantly being peppered with space debris, tons of it per day. We don't notice the constant stream of sand, dust and little rocks hitting our planet because most of the larger chunks burn up in the atmosphere and land as dust. The dust then gets washed into the soil by rain. It's a very subtle process, we don't notice it, but science tells us it's happening constantly.

Okay, so what?

Consider the implications, throughout earth's existence, it has been getting larger. It's estimated that the circumference of the earth grows by about a foot per year. That's a very small percentage of the overall circumference, seemingly inconsequential, but over tens of millions of years, it adds up, which explains a couple things.

One is, since the earth was smaller in the ancient past, it had less gravity, meaning animals could grow larger than they can today, like dinosaurs. The other thing it explains is why the continents are scattered across the earth with shorelines that match.

Oceans wash the shores of continents, any dust that lands on the shore is washed away, so no matter how much dust lands, the continents don't get larger, they keep shrinking due to erosion, but also growing taller, which pushes them down into the magma beneath. The continental plates grow where they're cracked: at the bottom of the oceans between the continents. This means that as the earth keeps acquiring space debris and growing larger, the continents keep moving further apart, which is why their shorelines match even though they are far apart.