+71

Somewhere in pi, there is a segment of a billion consecutive 1's. amirite?

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now show me the point of knowing what pi is... what is it used for???

@unknowncondition now show me the point of knowing what pi is... what is it used for???

Well, for example in plane and solid geometry, if you know the radius of a circle or sphere, and wish to calculate the circumference or area of the circle, or if you need the circumference, surface area or volume of the sphere, pi figures prominently in the calculation of all of those. Pi also appears in many equations of physics and engineering.
 
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Fo...quareWave.html

Thinkerbells avatar Thinkerbell Yeah You Are -3Reply
@Thinkerbell Well, for example in plane and solid geometry, if you know the radius of a circle or sphere, and wish to calculate...

how can using an infinite ratio be considered accurate to a mathematician ...seems like only exact volume would be needed to be known otherwise it's just an rounded estimation

@unknowncondition how can using an infinite ratio be considered accurate to a mathematician ...seems like only exact volume would be...

A pure mathematician would of course leave the answer in terms of the symbol π, but an engineer, experimental physicist or landscape architect would use a numerical value of pi taken out to as many places as they might need for sufficient accuracy in their applied work.

Thinkerbells avatar Thinkerbell Yeah You Are -2Reply

Ok snotty

P3AK1Ns avatar P3AK1N Yeah You Are 0Reply

Not necessarily

So there's also 6969 80085

Anonymous 0Reply

somewhere in pi ,there are infinete ones

Anonymous 0Reply
@somewhere in pi ,there are infinete ones

Wouldn't that just mean that there are no space for other numbers?

Anonymous 0Reply
@Wouldn't that just mean that there are no space for other numbers?

Infinity is weird. It doesn't conform to our notions of what a number should be (it isn't actually a number at all). Infinity is more of a concept, to describe something that is endless. This is why infinity +1 is still infinity, because "normal" math doesn't work with it. When infinity is involved, there is always more space, even when you already have an infinite amount of thing.

Anonymous 0Reply

Yes, since pi has an infinite number of digits distributed with equal frequency, there must be such a sequence of 1's, but it probably would take every supercomputer working together much longer than the remaining time left to the universe to find its first occurrence.
 
With an infinite number of monkeys at keyboards, one of them will type the complete works of Shakespeare too. [you stop the experiment when it happens for the first time] biggrin smilie

Thinkerbells avatar Thinkerbell Yeah You Are -3Reply
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