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Cuisines from rich countries are bland compared to cuisines from poor countries, amirite?

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Kasies avatar Money & Economics
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What's interesting about rich countries is that they have every food to choose from.

I would agree that the majority of people prefer blander food, but it isn't as though they don't have the option

@teknogreek What's interesting about rich countries is that they have every food to choose from. I would agree that the...

Yeah, I think it's one of those things where when something is easy to come by, you cherish it less. Whereas poor people have limited options in food, and try to make the best food they can make from it. They can't just waste food.

Kasies avatar Kasie Yeah You Are +2Reply
@Kasie Yeah, I think it's one of those things where when something is easy to come by, you cherish it less. Whereas poor...

That makes no sense. You are saying that the super rich people in India are eating bland food, and dirt poor ones are eating better tasting stuff?

What comes to this whole poverty theme that you seem to carry, it's not like all people in India (for example) are poor. There are super wealthy people too. You just don't even out the wealth inside your society. Food is completely separate thing from that.

@Kasie Yeah, I think it's one of those things where when something is easy to come by, you cherish it less. Whereas poor...

The dishes in the nordic countries are usually made from ingredients that are able to be locally grown and people's tastes differ in nordics compared to india for example.

Shiny244s avatar Shiny244 Yeah You Are +2Reply
@Kasie Yeah, I think it's one of those things where when something is easy to come by, you cherish it less. Whereas poor...

There's a lot of food in poor countries I would argue is bland though. Especially day to day food.

For example in many Asian countries it's common to have a bowl of rice with one or two pieces of meat that are lightly seasoned

Larny2019s avatar Larny2019 Yeah You Are +2Reply

You haven't eaten Turkmenistan before

France, Italy, and Japan are some of the richest countries in the world and all have amazing cuisine.

I guess that no purpose flour insult on the snow roach roast list is actually based lol.

This is neither unpopular nor an opinion. Spices come from the tropics, and poverty is concentrated in the Global South.

I think you're confusing bland with "not spicy".

jodzdzownicas avatar jodzdzownica Yeah You Are +3Reply
@jodzdzownica I think you're confusing bland with "not spicy".

Bland means food that isn't spicy, though. And I like strong bold flavors. Kimchi — sour and spicy. Flavors are easy to describe. I like that.

Kasies avatar Kasie Yeah You Are +2Reply
@Kasie Bland means food that isn't spicy, though. And I like strong bold flavors. Kimchi — sour and spicy. Flavors are...

Bland means food that isn't spicy, though.

It does not. Bland means it has no flavour. So, for example, an aged steak, or a ripe plum, or a smoked fish, or a mature cheese aren't spicy, but they aren't bland. It seems like you don't understand what bland means.

@Kasie Bland means food that isn't spicy, though. And I like strong bold flavors. Kimchi — sour and spicy. Flavors are...

(of food or drink) unseasoned, mild-tasting, insipid.

That's the definition in terms of food for the word bland. Now, sure, spice is a part of that definition but just because a dish isn't spicy doesn't mean it's bland.

vcsandfecess avatar vcsandfeces Yeah You Are +3Reply
@vcsandfeces (of food or drink) unseasoned, mild-tasting, insipid. That's the definition in terms of food for the word bland...

Spicy can also refer to the spices/seasoning used. Not just spicy hot, as in ghost pepper. So yes, to me a bland dish lacks spices and seasoning.

Kasies avatar Kasie Yeah You Are +3Reply
@Kasie Bland means food that isn't spicy, though. And I like strong bold flavors. Kimchi — sour and spicy. Flavors are...

If you need spices and condiments to make up for tasty food it might mean that the actual food isn't good in the first place. This kind of thinking is why processed foods are loaded with flavor enhancers.

Tldfonats avatar Tldfonat Yeah You Are +2Reply

Stupid take. Countries cuisines are heavily influenced by the ingredients readily available to them so warmer climates like everywhere you mentioned naturally have greater diversity of flavor as spices are easy to obtain.

opensofiass avatar opensofias Yeah You Are +3Reply

Exceptions include the ones you mentioned, plus Japan, China, Spain, etc

This would've been a lot easier if you just said "Northern European cuisine is bland" which isn't really unpopular

Yeah countries in the tropics where amazing produce grows all year long tend to not foster a saving culture as there is no annual prolonged period without food. Over time this means they do not get as rich as cold countries which do have saving cultures, but don't have the heat and sun for the sorts of plants that grow exciting flavours.

The few rich countries near the tropics have "exciting" food, eg: Singapore, and the the few poor countries nearer the poles have "boring" food, eg: Russia.

Thatoneduderyans avatar Thatoneduderyan Yeah You Are +3Reply

Assuming only talking about the original food associated with the ethnic majority, then I'd say it is mostly a function of geography. What spices grow there and that is commonly a function of distance from the equator.

So you're saying that countries who are so overworked they can't focus on food don't make as good food as poor countries who have all the time in the world to cook because they don't have work? Cuz that's what reality is

Haha what a mess

Just remember that national cuisines are often made from what was available back in the old days, and recipes influenced by nearby countries.

For Norway specifically, potatoes and cows and fish were pretty much it for food, and because of the climate it is hard to grow a variety of ingredients and spices. Also the closest influencers of the norwegian cuisine would be heavily influenced by UK, Sweden, Finland and Denmark, which probably had the same types of ingredients and were influenced by the same countries.

Kionixs avatar Kionix Yeah You Are +2Reply
@Kionix Just remember that national cuisines are often made from what was available back in the old days, and recipes...

Norway(and the rest) hasn't even had potatoes for that long. It didn't really become a staple until the late 18th- to early 19th century. Before then we literally lived of off porridge and bread.

@Some-Noname-idk Norway(and the rest) hasn't even had potatoes for that long. It didn't really become a staple until the late 18th-...

Well Norway was not their own country untill 1814, so it does make sense for them to use potatoes in their own national cuisine.

Kionixs avatar Kionix Yeah You Are +3Reply
@Kionix Well Norway was not their own country untill 1814, so it does make sense for them to use potatoes in their own...

Oh no my point wasn't that you're wrong, you're not. My point was that countries in Northern Europe for most of history didn't have a fraction of what countries further south and especially countries like Thailand or India had so it's unfair to compare them.

More related to geographic location as opposed to level of wealth. The farther you are from the equator the worst your food will be because spices are more prevalent in warmer places. It just so happens that most rich countries are located in the global north. Of course there are some exceptions like a few here who have already mentioned.

potatobunnys avatar potatobunny Yeah You Are +2Reply

I don't know, some poor countries can have bland food too.

Boknows12s avatar Boknows12 Yeah You Are +2Reply

Clearly you've never eaten Ethiopian food

@Framie1 Clearly you've never eaten Ethiopian food

It's super good? And they're sadly not very affluent. I don't think you've ever had real Ethiopian food.

@Framie1 Clearly you've never eaten Ethiopian food

I haven't tried Ethiopian food yet, but I just searched it and read that it's consists of very spicy dishes. And I LOVE spicy food so I definitely have to try it someday. I'm looking at an image of Eithopian stew right now and it already looks better than European food.

Kasies avatar Kasie Yeah You Are +1Reply

My aunt is from Norwegia and her Kjøttkaker is totally guddommelig.

Kasies avatar Kasie Yeah You Are +2Reply
@Kasie My aunt is from Norwegia and her Kjøttkaker is totally guddommelig.

I have no idea what Kjøttkaker or guddommelig means, but I assume it is good

You're not wrong, but it has more to do with climate and what has been available historically as a result of it than anything else. Like in Scandinavia the only things one might call spices available for most of history have been salt (which was used for preservation, not taste) and some rather mild tasting herbs.

Thanks for the laugh

Before refrigeration, hot spices were used to mask the taste of spoiled meat.

Here is the thing, I am not surprised you classed India as a poor country. The proper term is a developing country. Also Europeans did not have the spices Indians had for a while, and the so-called rich countries also had some good things to eat.

It's a matter of personal tastes.

Well there's that, plus the fact that poorer countries/people sometimes only have access to lower quality meats and ingredients, so they have to get creative to make them taste good. Look at Louisiana cuisine for example

Sooooo sooooo true poor countries know to bring the flavor of each thing they do and don't opt for small dishes and expansive or rare ingredients

88080808088s avatar 88080808088 Yeah You Are +2Reply

I guess it's hard to enjoy Japanese cuisine when your taste buds are constantly being overloaded. There is joy in simple things.

Shiny244s avatar Shiny244 Yeah You Are +1Reply

i think what you're trying to say is "Loud = good, quiet = bad". I think it's fine, but you're closing yourself off from a world of pleasure and thats your loss

Nickyikkys avatar Nickyikky Yeah You Are 0Reply
@Nickyikky i think what you're trying to say is "Loud = good, quiet = bad". I think it's fine, but you're closing yourself off...

On the other side of the spectrum, I know people who dislike food that are "too much" of a flavor for their tastebuds. My cousin, for example, is always complaining how a food is "too sour" or "too spicy" for him. At every single restaurant.

He eats scrambled eggs and nothing else most of the time cause flavors are too much for him to handle. At this point, nobody invites him out to eat.

Kasies avatar Kasie Yeah You Are +1Reply

This isn't an unpopular opinion. This is just blatantly ignorant.

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