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010 Things You Should Save For Your Kids These small, sentimental items will be treasured gifts, not a burden. Chances are, you never use your Grandma’s china set although you’ve schlepped it along for multiple moves because the idea of selling it feels wrong. So what do you want your kids to have — that won’t burden them the way the china set does? Setting aside these small treasures will truly be a gift: 1. Your First Passport Looking at all those country stamps from exotic places will remind them of what an adventurer you are. It also opens the door to retelling the stories of the time after college when you backpacked and hitchhiked through Europe and the Middle East. 2. Your Military Discharge Papers Aside from the very practical aspect that your children may one day need them to help get you services from the Department of Veteran Affairs, looking at old papers with old dates on them is infinitely cool. Plus, we’re told that nobody beats the VA when it comes to misplacing paperwork or not being able to find your records in their computer, so don’t toss them away. 3. One Printed Photo of Your Wedding Digital photography is fabulous as long as you backup your photos and don’t forget where you’ve backed them up to. But there is just something about being able to hold a printed photo in your hands. Old photos show their age, which in the case of old photos, is precisely the point. 4. Something Belonging to the Oldest Living Relative They Know Make it small but make it personal. And it must have belonged to someone they actually know. Unless they have an antique hairpin collection, being given a hairpin from your great-aunt who died before they were born reduces it to just being something old. Old stuff is for collectors. 5. A Sentimental Piece of Jewelry It may be the ring you got at your Sweet 16, or the watch you received from your dad when you graduated college. Its value lies in its sentiment. This doesn’t mean your diamond rings, unless there is sentiment attached and not just dollar signs. Things with big dollar signs belong in the family trust to be argued over later by your children. 6. A Receipt With a Date on It We guarantee they will laugh every time they rediscover it. Yes, a quart of milk really just cost 50 cents in 1960. Gas was about 35 cents a gallon, if you really want a guaranteed belly chuckle. We are partial to grocery lists on the day they were born, and hotel bills from vacations. 7. The Photo of the First Time You Held Them While you probably have a zillion baby pictures, the first one is the keeper. 8. Highlights of Their Childhood No, not the ubiquitous Little League or AYSO trophies. In fact, you can probably toss those out right now, no matter how old your kids are. Some of their early, precious art work also has a shelf life that has already expired. Ditto for those handprints in paint. But report cards are keepers, especially if there are teachers’ comments on them. Or the letter accepting them into college. 9. The Dog Tags Worn by Their Childhood Pets Our furry family members deserve to be remembered as well. Rusty’s name tag has a place in the remembrances box, along with a photo of him with the family. 10. Your Favorite Music, on a Platform They Can Use The box of old eight-tracks isn’t going to be of much use to Junior. Let the cat enjoy playing with the magnetic tape and see which songs you can download from the iTunes store. Only a handful of eight-tracks are worth anything today, and not even of much value to collectors. More
http://www.nextavenue.org/10-things-save-give-kids-someday/?utm_source=previews&utm_medium=email&utm_term=saveforkids&utm_content=previews9&utm_campaign=nextavenue_2016Image for post 10 Things You Should Save For Your Kids These small, sentimental items will be treasured gifts, not a burden. Chances are, you never use your Grandma’s china set although you’ve schlepped it along for multiple moves because the idea of selling it feels wrong. So what do you want your kids to have — that won’t burden them the way the china set does? Setting aside these small treasures will truly be a gift: 1. Your First Passport  Looking at all those country stamps from exotic places will remind them of what an adventurer you are. It also opens the door to retelling the stories of the time after college when you backpacked and hitchhiked through Europe and the Middle East. 2. Your Military Discharge Papers  Aside from the very practical aspect that your children may one day need them to help get you services from the Department of Veteran Affairs, looking at old papers with old dates on them is infinitely cool. Plus, we’re told that nobody beats the VA when it comes to misplacing paperwork or not being able to find your records in their computer, so don’t toss them away.  3. One Printed Photo of Your Wedding  Digital photography is fabulous as long as you backup your photos and don’t forget where you’ve backed them up to. But there is just something about being able to hold a printed photo in your hands. Old photos show their age, which in the case of old photos, is precisely the point. 4. Something Belonging to the Oldest Living Relative They Know  Make it small but make it personal. And it must have belonged to someone they actually know. Unless they have an antique hairpin collection, being given a hairpin from your great-aunt who died before they were born reduces it to just being something old. Old stuff is for collectors. 5. A Sentimental Piece of Jewelry  It may be the ring you got at your Sweet 16, or the watch you received from your dad when you graduated college. Its value lies in its sentiment. This doesn’t mean your diamond rings, unless there is sentiment attached and not just dollar signs. Things with big dollar signs belong in the family trust to be argued over later by your children. 6. A Receipt With a Date on It  We guarantee they will laugh every time they rediscover it. Yes, a quart of milk really just cost 50 cents in 1960. Gas was about 35 cents a gallon, if you really want a guaranteed belly chuckle. We are partial to grocery lists on the day they were born, and hotel bills from vacations. 7. The Photo of the First Time You Held Them  While you probably have a zillion baby pictures, the first one is the keeper. 8. Highlights of Their Childhood  No, not the ubiquitous Little League or AYSO trophies. In fact, you can probably toss those out right now, no matter how old your kids are. Some of their early, precious art work also has a shelf life that has already expired. Ditto for those handprints in paint. But report cards are keepers, especially if there are teachers’ comments on them. Or the letter accepting them into college. 9. The Dog Tags Worn by Their Childhood Pets  Our furry family members deserve to be remembered as well. Rusty’s name tag has a place in the remembrances box, along with a photo of him with the family. 10. Your Favorite Music, on a Platform They Can Use  The box of old eight-tracks isn’t going to be of much use to Junior. Let the cat enjoy playing with the magnetic tape and see which songs you can download from the iTunes store. Only a handful of eight-tracks are worth anything today, and not even of much value to collectors.
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+1Youtube's New TOS The following is Youtube's new terms of service when it comes to harassment: 1. Abusive videos, comments, messages 2. Revealing someone’s personal information 3. Maliciously recording someone without their consent 4. Deliberately posting content in order to humiliate someone 5. Making hurtful and negative comments/videos about another person 6. Unwanted sexualization, which encompasses sexual harassment or sexual bullying in any form 7. Incitement to harass other users or creators And here's my opinion on each of them; As for #1, I'm pretty sure that's unavoidable. What, Youtube, do you just think that everyone is a ray of sunshine? I'm not saying that some people deserve hate, but that can be so easily taken advantage of. Some people can be total dicks and do some even illegal shit, and now you're giving them the ability to say, "Oh, but you calling me out on doing something wrong is obviously bullying and harassment. I WILL have your channel taken down!" That's pretty fucked. And you're not just going to solve any problems like that by telling people to stop. It's not just black and white like that. If, for instance, LeafyisHere were to follow these guidelines, he wouldn't make videos, but sometimes poking fun at someone is for humor, and they have said explicitly not to send hate to the person who is being made fun of. #2 makes perfect sense. Keemstar. #3 also makes perfect sense. But I don't think anyone does that anyway. #4 is kinda fucked up because if someone said something shitty and you repost it so that tons of people can hear about this shitty thing that this guy did AHEM KEEMSTAR AHEM then they deserve that because they are a piece of shit. However, I can understand the rule if the person posting the content was saying something untrue about the victim AHEM KEEMSTAR AHEM STOP FUCKING CALLING PYRO A PEDO AHEM AHEM, because that's pretty fucked. #5 is like the same thing as number one and fuck you Youtube some people's revenue comes of that in case you didn't know, and it's purely for comedic purposes anyway. #6 makes sense. #7 -- yep the same as #5 and #1. Anyway I just wanted to get that off my chest. Also if you read this far in this then DAMN SON YOU MUST REALLY HAVE NO LIFE!!
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students up to three years behind Asian teens THE AUSTRALIAN FEBRUARY 6, 2016 12:00AM Natasha Bita Teacher mentor Sonia Byrnes with Emma Campbell and students Caitlin Hinh, Joseph Millwork and James Johnstone. Picture: Hollie Adams Chinese students have leapfrogged Australian teenagers by nearly three years in maths and are 18 months ahead in reading and science. Australian teenagers also lag behind high school students in Singapore, Hong Kong and Canada. Learning First, an Australian education research group, has crunched data from the OECD Program for International Student Assessment, which tested the basic skills 500,000 15-year-old students in 65 industrialised countries in 2012. It found that in maths, Australian students’ learning had fallen 32 months behind that of students in Shanghai and 17 months behind Hong Kong. Singaporean students were 20 months ahead of Australian teenagers, and high school kids in the Canadian province of British Columbia were five months ahead of Australians. Australia is producing more low-performing students, and fewer top-of-the-class students. MORE: Master teachers must lead the way MORE: School diversity should be praised The proportion of students who were in the top categories of ­mathematical ability in the PISA tests fell from 20 per cent in 2003 to 15 per cent in 2012. At the same time, the proportion of lowest-performing students rose from 14 per cent to 20 per cent. The report, to be published today, shows that family income has a bigger impact on academic performance in Australia than in most other developed countries. “This means that students from low-income backgrounds are not getting the education they deserve,’’ it says. Learning First chief executive Ben Jensen said yesterday Australia must improve teaching quality, in line with the high-performing countries. He said principals should be accountable for the performance of classroom teachers. “Teacher professional learning in high-performing education systems is not an add-on or something done on a Friday afternoon or for a few days at the end of the school year,’’ Dr Jensen said. “Too many teachers feel underprepared in classrooms, and the millions of dollars we invest in teacher professional development is too often viewed as a waste of time.’’ Dr Jensen said young Aus­tralian teachers required more feedback on their teaching. Professional development for Australian teachers is focused on workshops, conferences and online training. The NSW, Victorian and Queensland education departments have formal mentoring programs for experienced teachers to help new recruits. Casula Public School, in Sydney’s south, has used NSW government funding to hire a “team teacher’’ one day a week, to mentor 14 junior teachers on short-term contracts. The senior teacher, 42-year-old Sonia Byrnes, has 22 years’ classroom experience and now helps beginner teachers at five schools in Sydney’s southwest. “They just need reassurance they’re doing the right thing in the classroom,’’ Ms Byrnes said yesterday. “It’s important for them to ­establish classroom routines, to be consistent and fair with the children. Once they’ve got behaviour management under control, students stay engaged for a longer ­period of time. “I also build the teachers’ questioning skills, so they get children to think outside the square.’’ First-year teacher Emma Campbell, 22, has found her first weeks teaching a Year 4 class “a bit scary’’ and is grateful for advice from an experienced colleague. “It gives me reassurance I’m doing the right thing and I have feedback on my teaching and how I can improve it,’’ Ms Campbell said. “When I was teaching an Eng­lish lesson, Sonia suggested I try not to get the kids to put their hands up, but to choose them randomly to answer questions.’’ Australian Education Union president Correna Haythorpe said teachers needed more time away from the classroom to learn and collaborate. “Australian teachers have some of the largest workloads in the developed world and spend far more time teaching than the OECD average,’’ she said. Ms Haythorpe said the union’s survey of principals had found most schools were using their extra “Gonski’’ funding for professional development. “That is allowing teachers the time to develop their skills and knowledge, to collaborate and share what works, and to translate that into more effectively meeting the individual needs of students,’’ she said. Productivity Commission data released this week shows that federal, state and territory governments spent a record $50bn on schools in 2013-14. Funding to private schools rose five times faster than spending on public schools between 2009-10 and 2013-14.
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+2'Offensive and incorrect': Bill Shorten writes to US politician Ted Cruz on gun claims Date January 28, 2016 - 4:33PM Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has taken a swipe at US presidential candidate Ted Cruz for claiming the rates of sexual assault and rape soared in Australia following the introduction of strict gun laws. Mr Shorten has written directly to Senator Cruz after the conservative Christian – who is billionaire Donald Trump's closest rival for the Republican nomination – made the claims about the post-Port Arthur massacre laws earlier this month. Bill Shorten has defended the John Howard-era gun laws against criticism from US Republican Ted Cruz. Bill Shorten has defended the John Howard-era gun laws against criticism from US Republican Ted Cruz. Photo: a "As you know, Hugh, after Australia did that [gun buyback program], the rate of sexual assaults, the rate of rapes, went up significantly, because women were unable to defend themselves," he said on high-profile radio host Hugh Hewitt's show. Advertisement "There's nothing that criminals or terrorists like more than unarmed victims." But Mr Shorten has called the claims offensive and incorrect and defended the Howard-era reforms as "indisputably the right thing to do". Republican presidential candidate senator Ted Cruz. Republican presidential candidate senator Ted Cruz. Photo: AP "Twenty years after the chilling tragedy of Port Arthur, along with many Australians, I regard gun law reform as John Howard's finest achievement in office," he wrote. "Contrary to your comments, reducing the number and restricting the availability of semi-automatic weapons did not lead to an increase in the rates of violent crime, rape or sexual assault." After gunman Martin Bryant murdered 35 people and injured 23 at the former Port Arthur prison colony, a popular tourist destination, the Howard government introduced strict gun laws, including the buyback of over 600,000 firearms. Mr Shorten urged Senator Cruz to properly study the Australian example and not misrepresent it in a "misguided defence" of the United States' gun laws, which continue to be a contentious issue ahead of the country's election later this year. President Barack Obama and other Democrats, pointing to the rampant gun violence and regular mass shootings afflicting the country, are seeking to introduce gun control measures while the gun lobby and many Republicans defend the "right to bear arms" as enshrined in the constitution. Gun control advocates regularly refer to Australia's reforms as an example of successful gun restrictions, and in response the NRA and other gun rights advocates have attack the laws. Mr Shorten says "Americans deserve to know the truth that the reforms to Australia's gun laws are working and lives are being saved". He is backed up by a Washington Post fact check that examined Senator Cruz's claim and rated it a "whopper" of a factual error. The analysis found no significant spike or drop but a gradual increase in sexual assault rates over the decade after the 1996 changes in Australia. The increase was likely affected by a rise in the reporting of sexual assaults and there wasn't prevalent use of handguns for self-defence before 1996, as Senator Cruz suggested, the newspaper concluded. "The rates didn't go up 'significantly' after the buyback and there's no evidence changes to gun laws in Australia affected sexual assault rates or jeopardised the ability of women to protect themselves," the Washington Post said. Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/offensive-and-incorrect-bill-shorten-writes-to-us-politician-ted-cruz-on-gun-claims-20160128-gmg4yt.html#ixzz3yX5OrHS6 Follow us: @smh on Twitter | sydneymorningherald on Facebook
'Offensive and incorrect': Bill Shorten writes to US politician Ted Cruz on gun claimsOpposition Leader Bill Shorten has taken a swipe at US presidential candidate Ted Cruz for claiming the rates of sexual assault and rape soared in Australia following the introduction of strict gun laws.http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/offensive-and-incorrect-bill-shorten-writes-to-us-politician-ted-cruz-on-gun-claims-20160128-gmg4yt.html#ixzz3yX3u5Jqr
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+2Set in a futuristic society where books are prohibited, the classic dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury depicts the story of a firefighter named Montag who burns books for a living. Montag was leading an uncomplicated life, where he never questioned his job or society, until he meets a teenager named Clarisse. She challenges his thoughts and creates questions about life's meaning. It is not until he comes encounter with an old woman who rather burn with her books than live without them that he truly begins to ponder if books are really important or not. Fahrenheit 451 should not be banned because it is an important story that teaches its readers that books are important and our world would be nothing without them. The author mentions immoral things during the book, but the overall lesson it teaches is too important to take it away. One reason that it shouldn't be banned is because we should have the freedom to read whatever we would like to. No person should be able to define what is and what isn't tasteful and/or appropriate. In the Freedom to Read statement it's stated that "There is no place in our society for efforts to coerce the taste of others, to confine adults to the reading matter deemed suitable for adolescents, or to inhibit the efforts of writers to achieve artistic expression," (American Library Association Council). This means that it is not acceptable to have a book removed from a library or school because it doesn't abide by a single person's rules. The Freedom to Read statement also says that "It is not in public interest to force a reader to accept the prejudgment of the label characterizing any expression or its author as subversive or dangerous," (ALA Council). Similar to the previous statement, it says that forcing your opinions of a book onto another is not acceptable. A way of doing so would be banning a book, making the banning of Fahrenheit 451 unacceptable. Another reason it shouldn't be banned is because it is an award-winning piece of literature. It won the Prometheus Hall of Fame award in 1984, a prestigious award made to honor classic libertarian fiction (LFS). Another award it has won is the Retro Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1954 (Geeky Library). It is awarded for science fiction or fantasy stories of 40000 words or more. It is considered the best-known literary award for science fiction writing. If the book wasn't worthy of being in simple libraries, it wouldn't have won these awards. It has too much positive recognition to be taken away from the public. It teaches the importance of literature & knowledge and how our world would be more monstrous that it already is without them. Taking it away from libraries and schools will be taking away citizens' chances to read something that could completely change their perspective on books. Since the book is about the importance of books, seeing how the world could become without them may change a person’s appreciation for them completely. Many people do not understand the importance of books, so reading this novel would be a great way for them to understand it. Although the book does have accounts of immoral doings such as violence, cursing, and using God's name in vain, it is not enough reason to ban it. The First Amendment states that we have freedom of religion (Steve Mount). Taking it away because it goes against a single person's religion is not an adequate reason. Since it says that we have freedom of religion, Ray Bradbury did not have to abide by the rules of a single religion when writing the book. This means that banning it for going against one religion is unconstitutional. Many of the other reasons that citizens wanted this book taken out was for the mention of immoral topics or immoral doings. The “What Is Censorship?” article states that there is no proof that after hearing, watching, or reading about immoral acts that a person will act immorally. Most scientists agree that statistical correlations between two phenomena do not mean that one causes the other (ACLU). Most reasons people come up with to ban books are based on personal preference or thoughts, which doesn't quite work when it comes to books. Books have a wide range of topics and formats that everyone might not be a fan of, However, this doesn’t mean that it’s right for a book, like Fahrenheit 451, to be taken away from everyone because a person doesn’t approve of it. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Fahrenheit 451 does not deserve to be taken off of the shelves from everyone. It is loved by millions across the world and we should have the freedom to choose to read it. Taking it away because of someone's personal preferences would be useless, like taking a box of cookies away from homeless kids because one child doesn't like the type of cookie. It is not beneficial, considering the brilliant lesson the book teaches, and it is rude to the author who worked very hard on the book. The First Amendment states that we have freedom to express ourselves, which Ray Bradbury did. Taking away his work of art would simply be unconstitutional. It is important for us, as citizens, to understand that life without books is not a good life. The book teaches this perfectly, which is why it should stay on the shelves; to be a prime example of what the world should never come to. sources: http:geekylibrary.com/hugo-award-for-best-novel/ http:www.lfs.org/awards.shtml http:www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/statementspols/freedomreadstatement http:www.usconstitution.net/xconst_Am1.html https://www.aclu.org/what-censorship
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