LOADED QUESTIONS Entertaining or Dangerous?
@2767851

Jeez! - What a cu...
You know what, I and every other moral person will be looking over to the left for a few moments. [Wow, it's kind of loud all of a sudden - can't hear a thing!]

Would you be a lamb and pick up that 2X4 over there at your cousins feet?

I am so sick of the liberal media. All we see is oils spills and massive coal ash spills. They are so biased and unfair. You never see any reports on MSNBC or CNN about the wind spills or solar spills. Why is that?!? Think about that for minute. Thank goodness of fair balanced reporting by FOX news. Tell the truth for once!
@2768620

Oh, that's OK Chuck. 'People close to the situation', big, important people that wear lab coats and everything report that the hundreds of thousands of bats and birds by windmills are 'mere incidental'. In other words, they don't matter.

So, as you can see, the progressive left is consistent. They think the same way about their unborn children. Lives other than their own, are kind of unimportant.

*** END OF SARCASM ****

A Success Story! Jesse was a chicken pluck-er. That's right. He stood on a line in a chicken factory and spent his days Pulling the feathers off dead chickens so the rest of us wouldn't have to. It wasn't much of a job. But at the time, Jesse didn't think he was much of a person. His father was a brute of a man. His dad was actually thought to be mentally ill and treated Jesse rough all of his life. Jesse's older brother wasn't much better. He was always picking on Jesse and beating him up. Yes, Jesse grew up in a very rough home in West Virginia. Life was anything but easy. He thought life didn't hold much hope for him. That's why he was standing in this chicken line, doing a job that darn few people wanted. In addition to all the rough treatment at home, it seems that Jesse was always sick. Sometimes it was real physical illness, but way too often it was all in his head. He was a small child, skinny and meek. That sure didn't help the situation any. When he started to school, he was the object of every bully on the playground. He was a hypochondriac of the first order. For Jesse, tomorrow was not always something he looked forward to. But, he had dreams. He wanted to be a ventriloquist. He found books on ventriloquism. He practiced with sock puppets and saved his hard earned dollars until he could get a real ventriloquist dummy. When he got old enough, he joined the military. Even though many of his hypochondriac symptoms persisted, the military did recognize his talents and put him in the entertainment corp. That was when his world changed and he gained confidence. He found that he had a talent for making people laugh, and laugh so hard they often had tears in their eyes. Yes, little Jesse had found himself. You know, folks, the history books are full of people who overcame a handicap to go on and make a success of themselves, but Jesse is one of the few I know of who didn't overcome it. Instead he used his paranoiato make a million dollars, and become one of the best-loved characters of all time in doing it! Yes, that little paranoid hypochondriac, who transferred his nervousness into a successful career, still holds the record for the most Emmy's given in a single category. The wonderful, gifted, talented, and nervous comedian who brought us Barney Fife was: Jesse Don Knotts. NOW YOU KNOW "THE REST OF THE STORY" There is a street named for him and his statue in Morgantown, West Virginia, his place of birth. Jesse Donald "Don" Knotts (July 21, 1924 - February 24, 2006)
@BarbOBarr Great show. I loved ole Barney.

Me too, he played the part to perfection.

Where do you draw the line on what is art?

When you purchase a toliet lid, label it, and post it as art

A Success Story! Jesse was a chicken pluck-er. That's right. He stood on a line in a chicken factory and spent his days Pulling the feathers off dead chickens so the rest of us wouldn't have to. It wasn't much of a job. But at the time, Jesse didn't think he was much of a person. His father was a brute of a man. His dad was actually thought to be mentally ill and treated Jesse rough all of his life. Jesse's older brother wasn't much better. He was always picking on Jesse and beating him up. Yes, Jesse grew up in a very rough home in West Virginia. Life was anything but easy. He thought life didn't hold much hope for him. That's why he was standing in this chicken line, doing a job that darn few people wanted. In addition to all the rough treatment at home, it seems that Jesse was always sick. Sometimes it was real physical illness, but way too often it was all in his head. He was a small child, skinny and meek. That sure didn't help the situation any. When he started to school, he was the object of every bully on the playground. He was a hypochondriac of the first order. For Jesse, tomorrow was not always something he looked forward to. But, he had dreams. He wanted to be a ventriloquist. He found books on ventriloquism. He practiced with sock puppets and saved his hard earned dollars until he could get a real ventriloquist dummy. When he got old enough, he joined the military. Even though many of his hypochondriac symptoms persisted, the military did recognize his talents and put him in the entertainment corp. That was when his world changed and he gained confidence. He found that he had a talent for making people laugh, and laugh so hard they often had tears in their eyes. Yes, little Jesse had found himself. You know, folks, the history books are full of people who overcame a handicap to go on and make a success of themselves, but Jesse is one of the few I know of who didn't overcome it. Instead he used his paranoiato make a million dollars, and become one of the best-loved characters of all time in doing it! Yes, that little paranoid hypochondriac, who transferred his nervousness into a successful career, still holds the record for the most Emmy's given in a single category. The wonderful, gifted, talented, and nervous comedian who brought us Barney Fife was: Jesse Don Knotts. NOW YOU KNOW "THE REST OF THE STORY" There is a street named for him and his statue in Morgantown, West Virginia, his place of birth. Jesse Donald "Don" Knotts (July 21, 1924 - February 24, 2006)

I had no idea. He was a skinny little guy, for sure.
His nervous humor, though, was distracting to me.

@2768680

My lawn is a lovely montage of violets, wild strawberries, dandelions, clover and an occasional blade of grass.