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Its weird how some British people lose their accents when singing. amirite?

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It's not just the Brits, is really everyone. We're taught to sing in a certain accent for it to sound beautiful where you make vowels rounder and enunciate and such, so it's more that we all have a singing accent...

Try singing along to Eminem with a strong English accent and see how retarded you sound.

Anonymous +12Reply

it's even weirder to listen to people sing English lyrics when they don't speak any English

Hey Americans, ever heard of the Ting Tings? You sing their songs in british accents. Like "Shut up and let me go."

Natalie Horler (singer for Cascada) has a German accent, it's really weird listening to her speak...

Laprass avatar Lapras Yeah You Are +3Reply

In my case it's the opposite; I don't speak with a British accent, but I sing with one for classical music (like the kind for voice training and stuff).

Anonymous +3Reply

That's kinda why people like Luke Pritchard from the Koooks

BobWilsons avatar BobWilson Yeah You Are +2Reply

Singers are basically trained not to have too distinctive an accent. Rounded-off sounds are the way to go :] Ahs not ays, ehs not ees, ahr not are, and so on :)

Anonymous +1Reply
@Singers are basically trained not to have too distinctive an accent. Rounded-off sounds are the way to go :] Ahs...

only for pop music, jazz, soul and stuff classical singers are told to sing in british accents.

mylifeisflys avatar mylifeisfly Yeah You Are 0Reply
@mylifeisfly only for pop music, jazz, soul and stuff classical singers are told to sing in british accents.

In chorus/show choir/musicals we've always been told as little distinctive accent as possible, just rounded sounds. To quote my director of Les Mis: "We don't want New Yorker or Philly Valjean, but try to avoid London Valjean too. Same goes for our Thenardiers and Enjolrases."

Anonymous +1Reply
@In chorus/show choir/musicals we've always been told as little distinctive accent as possible, just rounded sounds...

my teacher said the rounded vowels thing too but only for the vowels that came at the end of the word. but for the most part we sounded british because we weren't allow to pronounce "r" if they came at the end of the word like "remembuh" (remember) and "t"s were more profound like for "water" "waTuh" not "waadurr" like most americans say it. We did all classical music or "modern music" that was meant to be sung in a classical style like the Phantom of the Opera.

mylifeisflys avatar mylifeisfly Yeah You Are 0Reply
@mylifeisfly my teacher said the rounded vowels thing too but only for the vowels that came at the end of the word. but for the...

Our pieces are odd...they aren't quite classical but they aren't quite "modern" either....
And don't get me started on water xD. I'm from Philly, so it's fun going from "woodur" to "wahTahr"

Anonymous 0Reply

Singing in my own accent just feels awkward.

Truuninjas avatar Truuninja Yeah You Are 0Reply

Natsha Bedingfield

528491s avatar 528491 Yeah You Are 0Reply

Its probably because the style of singing we are accustomed to today developed in America. If you sang something like ...say English hymns which are much older people sing in a British accent whether they are British or not

mylifeisflys avatar mylifeisfly Yeah You Are -4Reply
@no

see the comment below mine....thats exactly what im taking about. Every style of music has an accent associated with it.

mylifeisflys avatar mylifeisfly Yeah You Are 0Reply
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