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This may just be because I'm British, but the American High School system seems pretty damn complicated, amirite?

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davewilk99s avatar Education
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Go in dumb, come out smart. YOU CAN'T EXPLAIN THAT!!!

Yeah, we're kind of a big deal.

Sexys avatar Sexy Yeah You Are +52Reply

I think having to remember all the crap you learned after two years for a final exam would be deadly.

@HeyJud3 I think having to remember all the crap you learned after two years for a final exam would be deadly.

It is, try taking IB here in the U.S. I took it in high school, and we had to memorize everything from Junior and Senior year for a couple of exams.

@Fragments_sissy It is, try taking IB here in the U.S. I took it in high school, and we had to memorize everything from Junior and...

IB is amazing, dude. It's tough, but so worth it because university is a BREEZE afterward. :)

Anonymous +2Reply
@Fragments_sissy It is, try taking IB here in the U.S. I took it in high school, and we had to memorize everything from Junior and...

That's why I took Dual Enrollment classes. You do all the same work as AP and IB students, but you don't have to rely on an exam at the end to determine whether or not you get credit for your work.

go to school for 4 years. whats so complicated about that?

Scups avatar Scup No Way +27Reply
@Scup go to school for 4 years. whats so complicated about that?

Oh, I don't know. Perhaps it's all the core courses, the electives, the credits, your GPA, regular courses, honours courses, AP courses, student IDs, student passwords, locker combinations, room numbers and the all-important lunch tables. Maybe it is really that simple.

davewilk99s avatar davewilk99 Yeah You Are +27Reply
@davewilk99 Oh, I don't know. Perhaps it's all the core courses, the electives, the credits, your GPA, regular courses, honours...

Well you have core courses like math and english. you need a certain amount of credits to pass onto your next year. Your GPA is pretty much just an over all score of all your grades together. Electives are courses you don't have to take but rather want to, honors classes are harder than regular classes, AP classes are college level courses and gain you credits for college. You carry around your ID for certain things depending on what school you go to, and then you remember a simple locker combination and remember where your classes are.... It's really not hard.

Scups avatar Scup No Way +28Reply
@Scup Well you have core courses like math and english. you need a certain amount of credits to pass onto your next year...

It's pretty much the same in America, depending on what state you're in. In California, we are forced to take at least 1 year of VPA, though. The main differences are how many years of core classes you're required to take.

NotAllHeres avatar NotAllHere Yeah You Are +1Reply
@davewilk99 Oh, I don't know. Perhaps it's all the core courses, the electives, the credits, your GPA, regular courses, honours...

Someone on DBPB told me that in England they have a different grading system for every class. It sounded hard. What do you guys do? I can't imagine not having lockers and passwords and room numbers. What does all-important lunch tables mean?

@Frank_n_Furter Someone on DBPB told me that in England they have a different grading system for every class. It sounded hard. What...

In England, you take a number of 2 year long courses, usually about 8 or 9 subjects. After 2 years, you have a final exam on each of those subjects. That is all the education that the government requires you to have. Simples.

davewilk99s avatar davewilk99 Yeah You Are +9Reply
@davewilk99 In England, you take a number of 2 year long courses, usually about 8 or 9 subjects. After 2 years, you have a...

I don't use the lockers. You have core classes that range from standard, ap and ib (in order of easiest to hardest ) usually four classes a day and eight classes in total that alternate between the fays of the week (ex: a day; a1 a2 a3 a4/ b day; b1 b2 b3 b4. Monday: a day, Tuesday : b day, wens: a, Thurs: b, fri: a, next weeks Monday b,) and for the student ids it basically is your lunch, computer login, and everything. Passwords are usually birthday of the student and they are a easy way tp keep track of the student and for the student to keep track of his grades via websites. And we have exams (mid, final/end of year ), also acts/sats (I believe are optional). Sounds complicated but goes over quite smoothly. Plus we (atleast here)are have college administered classes available by tenth grade going into many medical, electronic, automotive fields. Although the grading scale isn't the same as college generally

My town is really small so we have a k-12 school. It sucks balls.

@Dameequa My town is really small so we have a k-12 school. It sucks balls.

How many were in your school? Mine ranged from 90 to 115 kids. I graduated eighth grade with 6 other guys. I liked it though. Very family-like, relaxed, and individualized, so we got as much or as little help as we needed.

@Dameequa 300. But it's two towns combined.

There's over 2,000 at my school... We have the most out of any high school in the state. Plus the school wasn't built for this many kids so you get squashed in the hallways.

MusicalXMollys avatar MusicalXMolly Yeah You Are +3Reply
@Dameequa My town is really small so we have a k-12 school. It sucks balls.

There are tons of independant schools in my area that are k-12, and they have about 300 students each. I even applied to two of them when I was going to high school. They're nice, though: huge campases (horse stables, outdoor pools, lakes, woods, etc), super laid back (you call the teachers by name, no uniform) and stuff. The only thing I didn't like was the fact that everything would be more focused on the younger kids, plus everyone but me would already know eachother from primary and elementary school.

hmm. I had K-5 as elementary school, 6-8 as Middle school, and 9-12 as High school. But I switched schools like 20 times, so its fine :)

I don't think it's complex, it's probably just different from what you're used to. Pre-school is optional, so I didn't go, so my first schooling was at kindergarten. After kindergarten I started primary elementary school (which now has its own building for grades K-2, but when I went it was connected to the regular elementary building). Primary elementary school is grades K-2, as mentioned earlier. Then 3rd grade came, which started elementary school. Elementary school is 3-5 grade in my school. You don't pick classes, switch classes, or have lockers. Middle school (6-8th grade) is when you switch class and have lockers. Not too confusing, you switch to your next class when the bell rings, and the combinations are simple numbers (ex. 21-48-39). Next comes high school, and that's 9-12 grade (the grades are: freshman, sophomore, junior, senior). You get to choose classes in this point, and you choose them based on your grades (smart kids go for honours and AP, while average go for college prep or standard). The teachers pretty much suggest what you should take. Then comes college, which is a whole other story, so I'll jsut leave now, and hopefully you're not confused!

@Eminna Tl; dr.

How did you graduate school if you can't be bothered to read long paragraphs? That's all school makes you do.

Anonymous -4Reply
@How did you graduate school if you can't be bothered to read long paragraphs? That's all school makes you do.

I haven't graduated yet...and just because I didn't read that paragraph doesn't mean I don't read in school..

Canada has the easiest school system to follow. K-8 grade school,same teacher all day every day. 9-12 high school you pick classes 4 a day for each semester

Tetotays avatar Tetotay Yeah You Are +4Reply
@Tetotay Canada has the easiest school system to follow. K-8 grade school,same teacher all day every day. 9-12 high school...

Not true, you generally have a different teacher for French. In most areas it is K-8 but in some areas it is K-6. In those areas, you either get middle schools or high schools go from 7-12. 7 and 8 run in different circuits than the high schoolers. 7-8s get full-year courses and 3 or 4 different teachers. High schoolers (9-12) get to choose some courses but others are mandatory. If you go to a catholic school four of the twelve courses you get to choose have to be religion. There are more complex things like co-ed, dual credit and stuff. Twice a year you have to write end of semester exams, during high school. No enterance exams for most colleges/universities.

@Tetotay Canada has the easiest school system to follow. K-8 grade school,same teacher all day every day. 9-12 high school...

I'm Canadian and that's accurate for the most part. My first school had only K-5, which then you went to middle school/high school (same building.) My second and third school had K-6 which then you had to go to this other school that had K-8. My 4th school had K-8 as well. For the 7th and 8th grade, I had the same teacher for English, Math, Geography/History and Phys. Ed. Science, Drama/Music, and French all had different teachers. When I came to high school, it's almost the same, except in the 10th grade, Civics and Career Studies are half a period each. It all depends on where you live.

My middle school doesn't have lockers...it really sucks

@Rainbow_Panda My middle school doesn't have lockers...it really sucks

nor does my high school. but we got free macbooks, which makes up for it. even though it's probably the dumbest waste of money my whole state has ever done.

Anonymous +12Reply
@nor does my high school. but we got free macbooks, which makes up for it. even though it's probably the dumbest...

What state? I think my school system is the first in New Jersey to have the program. We use our laptops a lot, but we need at least 2 networks, because having 300+ laptops using the wi-fi and going through the proxy servers at the same time calls for some SERIOUSLY slow loading. I'm talking dial-up speeds. Yeah. Not very fun.

@FlyingMintBunny Do you get to keep the MacBooks?

No. You just pay for the insurance every year (it's $60, and some kids find it very handy. lol) and the school takes it back at the end of each school year to wipe it clean and give it back. Seniors' goes to freshmen. At least, that's how it works for us.

@nor does my high school. but we got free macbooks, which makes up for it. even though it's probably the dumbest...

A lot of the times when schools do something others see as a 'waste of money' is because they are given grants and they have to spend it on certain things or else it goes away. It seems like a waste, but they might as well use it on something than not do anything with it at all.

It's not complicated, just terrible.

This may be because I'm American, but I don't see how.

Really it's just like elementary school. We have to take core classes each year, and instead of having specific "specials" each day (PE, music, art) we get to choose electives. The counselors are pretty much the only ones that have to deal with the confusing part.

Here's my American education thus far: preschool in a local church, kindergarten in an elementary school. Said elementary school is K to grade 6. After elementary (primary for British folks), Middle school, which is grades 7 and 8. It's called Middle school, but we share a building with the high schoolers (some of the same teachers too). Each middle school grade is split up into two teams, named by colors (ex: green team and white, red team and blue). These teams share only electives (ex: language, pe, art, health), not "team classes" (math, English, science, history). Grades 9-12, high school, does not have teams, but share the same classrooms and teachers as the middle schoolers. It does seem awfully complicated, doesn't it? I suppose it's only easy because I'm used to it.

colettes avatar colette Yeah You Are -3Reply
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