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Are you religious?

No. It really is not.

Jakubklementewiczs avatar Jakubklementewicz Yeah You Are +15Reply

Oil from Garbage
Modern-day alchemy

There may be an elegant solution on the horizon to the gigantic problem of garbage—and not just the kind that gets dumped in landfills, but hard-to-recycle plastics, too, along with agricultural wastes, used tires, and just about everything else. More good news: we might get to reduce dependence on foreign oil and pay less for gasoline in the process.

The technology that makes it possible to do this is called the thermal depolymerization process, or TDP for short. It was developed for commercial use a couple of decades ago by a company called Changing World Technologies (now owned by Canadian firm Ridgeline Energy Services), and its first full-scale plant operated for a number of years in Carthage, Missouri. Now various other firms are taking the same technology in other directions. In any case, the idea behind TDP is not new—in fact, it’s millions of years old. Take organic matter, subject it to heat and pressure, and eventually you get oil. Of course in nature, “eventually” is usually an inconvenient number of millennia; TDP shortens that time to hours.

TDP is a surprisingly straightforward five-step process. First, raw materials are fed into an industrial-grade grinder where they’re chopped up into extremely small bits and mixed with water. The mixture is then subjected to heat and pressure, breaking molecular bonds and reducing the material to simpler components in as little as 15 minutes. The next step is reducing the pressure dramatically to drive off the water; in the process, some useful minerals such as calcium and magnesium settle out as valuable byproducts. The remaining slurry is sent into a second reactor, which uses even higher temperatures to produce a hydrocarbon mixture. Finally, a distillation step divides the hydrocarbons into vaporous gas (a mixture of methane, propane, and butane), liquid oil (similar to a mixture of gasoline and motor oil), and powdered carbon.

All that to say: garbage in, (black) gold out. The process itself produces no waste materials, unless you count water, which can be recycled in the system. The gas can be used to produce heat for the machine itself; oil can be sent to refineries to be made into a variety of useful products; carbon can be turned into everything from water filters to toner cartridges; and the remaining minerals can be used as fertilizer.

Virtually any organic material can be fed into a TDP apparatus. By making adjustments to the combinations of temperature, pressure, and cooking times, various input products (referred to as feedstock) can produce a wide range of output products; the proportions of, say, gas to oil to carbon will depend on the composition of the feedstock.

https://itotd.com/articles/8703/oil-from-garbage/

@Maze Oil from Garbage Modern-day alchemy There may be an elegant solution on the horizon to the gigantic problem of...

Wow...one day a worker in the future will be saying..."if only more 21 century people littered beer cans and takeout , we wouldnt have this current oil crisis," Greta will be remembered as a villain

@Toounknown Wow...one day a worker in the future will be saying..."if only more 21 century people littered beer cans and...

Greta inspired thousand s to pick up cans in spite of the space oil barrons profits , stubbornly taking action ,when sitting idle will do

yes because those two things are literally the same

No, also illegal,in most of Europe anyway

"we figured that one big pile was better than two little piles and rather than bring that one up, we decided to throw ours down." - Arlo Guthrie

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