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The guy who decided where each key goes on a keyboard has more influence on you than can ever imagine, amirite?

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🤔 I suspect you severely underestimate the power of imagination and overestimate the influence this has on people.

Lionel Qwert?

Mrtechnohawks avatar Mrtechnohawk Yeah You Are +9Reply

His name was Qwerty U. Iop and he owns your soul

capamericasurs avatar capamericasur Yeah You Are +8Reply
@capamericasur His name was Qwerty U. Iop and he owns your soul

Well, not for German language keyboard users. Ours i called Quertz U. Iopü and he is a nice guy that gives free healthcare to all of us.

He had exactly as much influence on me as creating the conditions for the amount of time I budget towards typing when it's necessary to do so, and how my fingers move when actually typing. It's not more influence than I, or indeed anyone, can imagine.

If he hadn't invented querty he would've invented something else good enough for a reasonable typing speed. And if he didn't invented a good enough typewriter someone else would have invented it instead, or improved on it.

Iapetus-11s avatar Iapetus-11 Yeah You Are +8Reply
@Iapetus-11 He had exactly as much influence on me as creating the conditions for the amount of time I budget towards typing...

You don't understand. If we can't rely on ctrl+v being next to ctrl+c, can we really rely on anything? The existence of the entire universe would get called into question.

JimKBs avatar JimKB Yeah You Are +8Reply

You clearly don't know why that specific layout was chosen

He had an impact sure, he doesn't have influence.

Damn you, John Qwerty!

@Framie1 Damn you, John Qwerty!

And his German brother John Qwertz!

@Effectlive97 And their French cousin, Jacques Azerty!

And the shut-in that lives in their basement but is insanely smart albeit not well known: August Dvorak

@Heinerprahm And his German brother John Qwertz!

And his Russian brother, John Dvorak.

Their unusual family tradition of naming everyone John and not sharing family names tends to confuse people.

srilarts avatar srilart Yeah You Are +5Reply
@Framie1 Damn you, John Qwerty!

Pretty sure his first name was Tab.

The keys are placed so that most frequent letters can be typed with ease.

jodzdzownicas avatar jodzdzownica Yeah You Are +7Reply

Fun fact, the key arrangement was originally set up for a typewriter, but a problem with a typewriter was that if you typed too fast or too many adjacent keys at once it would jam up, so they had to take this into account with the keyboard and make a layout that was efficient but not too efficient keeping commonly paired letters apart from each other.

It's carryover from the typewriting days where keys would actually get jammed or the mechanisms entangled when people typer too quickly.

..I'm not old, I swear!!

silvercatbobs avatar silvercatbob Yeah You Are +6Reply

Can you imagine how much more difficult WASD would be if they weren't all together?

Milkzeys avatar Milkzey Yeah You Are +6Reply

The reason is so a typewriter doesn't jam as you're typing fast. No longer technology relevant but like the USB we're stuck with the configuration because we all use it.

Vic8760s avatar Vic8760 Yeah You Are +6Reply

laughs in dvorak

@Cheytuflya laughs in dvorak

There are dozens of us!

Milkzeys avatar Milkzey Yeah You Are +5Reply

You clearly don't understand what influence means

@Sharag You clearly don't understand what influence means

The influence is pretty much zero since we would have to learn to use any other Lay-out pretty much the same way, except for perhaps more familiar orders like the alphabetical order where we would have an easier time finding a key we aren't familiar with.

Influence over what tho. How fast we type? Not really a high form of power

Not sure you know what influence means.

Are we talking about the qwerty layout or the staggering of the letters. The staggering was due to how the type writer functions and is not necessary now. Even in the mechanical keyboard community many enthusiast have Ortho linear layouts making the keys line up vertically.

Thatoneduderyans avatar Thatoneduderyan Yeah You Are +4Reply

It would actually be the person who invented the typewriter, as the keys on a keyboard mimic those that we find on a typewriter.

This was so the transition from using typewriters to using keyboards would be as smooth as possible.

@EmigrandE It would actually be the person who invented the typewriter, as the keys on a keyboard mimic those that we find on...

It would actually be the person who redesigned the typewriter standard. The original design for typewriters was so effective people would type too fast (mostly in a specific zone of the board iirc) causing the typewriters to jam up. To prevent this and make their product last longer, they switched to QWERTY so that the the useful letters are spread evenly amongst the board and slows the typer down.

@sharmaji1301 It would actually be the person who redesigned the typewriter standard. The original design for typewriters was so...

Already aware of the issue of jamming keys, not aware that the qwerty typewriter was invented by a separate person so thank you for this information.

Mrtechnohawks avatar Mrtechnohawk Yeah You Are +9Reply
@sharmaji1301 It would actually be the person who redesigned the typewriter standard. The original design for typewriters was so...

they switched to QWERTY so that the the useful letters are spread evenly amongst the board and slows the typer down.

Absolutely false. It's true that fast typers would jam up the type bars, but the rearrangement of the keys was to place the most common digraphs far enough apart to allow the previous bar time to clear before three next one arrived. The arrangement was to facilitate the faster typing, not to slow typists down.

Nickyikkys avatar Nickyikky Yeah You Are +8Reply
@Nickyikky they switched to QWERTY so that the the useful letters are spread evenly amongst the board and slows the typer...

causing the typewriters to jam up.

to allow the previous bar time to clear before three next one arrived

To me these seem like essentially the same thing

@Stereotypesexist Yeah, that myth is so stupid I'm surprised it's so common.

I feel like when I heard the myth it was perpetrated by people peddling dvorak keyboards.

@SnooStories I feel like when I heard the myth it was perpetrated by people peddling dvorak keyboards.

Qwerty is a rather inefficient layout, and preventing typewriter jams does seem like a reasonable explanation. But simply designing a slow layout would be stupid, instead what it does is move letters that often come after one another far apart on the keyboard. Being slower is an unfortunate byproduct of that, rather than the goal.

Dvorak is better but it's still far from optimal, I use Colemak DH which is better but still not optimal since it's designed to be somewhat easy to transition to from qwerty.

@sharmaji1301 Why even change from qwerty? I feel like its fast enough. Do you notice a difference in speed?

Seriously I already type faster than I can generally come up with text to type out lol.

Shiny244s avatar Shiny244 Yeah You Are +6Reply
@sharmaji1301 Why even change from qwerty? I feel like its fast enough. Do you notice a difference in speed?

Main reason I and probably a lot of other people swap keyboard layout is for ergonomics, having most of your typing done without moving your hands from the homerow is very nice especially when you are typing for many hours a day.

(I use semimak)

@Stereotypesexist Yeah, that myth is so stupid I'm surprised it's so common.

I feel like it was on Cracked like 15 years ago or something

@Nickyikky they switched to QWERTY so that the the useful letters are spread evenly amongst the board and slows the typer...

Yeah that myth always seemed corny to me, splitting up commonly-used-together letters made more sense, like how Q and U are on opposite sides of the keyboard and A/E/IOU are different.

I guess not too many words have the UIO vowels in close proximity, huh?

Maybe it's just because I learned QWERTY from a young age, but it's definitely a lot faster than those game console keyboards that would put the letters in alphabetical order. I remember it was a big deal when the Xbox 360 finally got QWERTY.

Mrtechnohawks avatar Mrtechnohawk Yeah You Are +6Reply
@sharmaji1301 It would actually be the person who redesigned the typewriter standard. The original design for typewriters was so...

The two-row was definitely not faster than QWERTY and its variations (AZERTY, QWERTZ). Maybe the four-row with all the vowels on a single row had a less steep learning curve, but it wasn't faster either. Typewritters jammed because two consecutive letters were pressed together, but the time it took people to write a whole paragraph remained the same.

Dvorak and its variations (Colemak) are actually faster, but Colemak was not made for typewriters; it's rather a layout that applies the Dvorak method while trying to stay similar to QWERTY.

@Openeyes The two-row was definitely not faster than QWERTY and its variations (AZERTY, QWERTZ). Maybe the four-row with all...

Maybe theres less finger motion, but im still not sure that it's any faster. It feels like theres a lot of confirmation bias if you have to practice typing on the layout and you know that more practice = faster typing. If people spent as much time not just using, but practicing and improving on QWERTY, the hype may not be as much

@lazar94 Maybe theres less finger motion, but im still not sure that it's any faster. It feels like theres a lot of...

Can confirm in my experience. I maxed out around 90ish AWPM on QWERTY and it's the same on Dvorak. However I do find typing Dvorak to be easier on my wrists since I don't have as much reaching to do. Source: been typing Dvorak for many years.

Vic8760s avatar Vic8760 Yeah You Are +4Reply
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