+105

I'm utterly convinced that people use 'of' instead of 'have' on purpose, amirite?

100%Yeah You Are0%No Way
browndog888s avatar Money & Economics
Share
0 122
The voters have decided that browndog888 is right! Vote on the post to say if you agree or disagree.

I have never seen that before

@browndog888 I envy you, I really do

But like give me an example, I don't understand how the words could be interchanged, sounds lunatic.

"Irregardless" drives me nuts.

As does, "I could care less."

Do people not listen to their own words?

@DueBodybuilde "Irregardless" drives me nuts. As does, "I could care less." Do people not listen to their own words?

Ugh, unfortunately some dictionaries have actually added "irregardles" because so many idiots use it. Same with "entitled" as "film entitled Pulp Fiction". It's sad, LOL.

Thank you. I am so sick of it

Sorry to havefend you

That's the only one you've noticed? There are probably hundreds of examples of this. One of my biggest pet peeves (I have a lot lol) is how often people type WOMEN when they mean WOMAN and vice versa. It's absurd how common it is.

@SnooStories That's the only one you've noticed? There are probably hundreds of examples of this. One of my biggest pet peeves...

Oh I notice those errors too, but this one grinds my gears especially since 'of' shares none of the same letters as 'have', it's breaking up a perfectly good contraction and, worst of all, it isn't even a verb but a fricking preposition. It's not just wrong, it is incredibly wrong.

Have Mice and Men was a very different book.

I should of have.

Openeyess avatar Openeyes Yeah You Are +4Reply

They should use "'ve" that's the proper shortening i.e. "should've" for "should have". That's why people get confused because phonetically it's close to "off"

I think I say it lot but it's in contraction forms. Could've or should've really sounds like Could of or should of

Tanmoykayesens avatar Tanmoykayesen Yeah You Are +4Reply

id say people arent certain which spelling is correct and since this particular mistake is becoming more widespread, more people think this is the correct spelling. it is fanning its own flames

Kasies avatar Kasie Yeah You Are +4Reply

No for real though, I think this guy is so right, and it's a very scary thing to let slide because then we're on the slippery slope of having degenerative grammar disorder as a society.

Cheytuflyas avatar Cheytuflya Yeah You Are +4Reply

People just don't understand english anymore.

I do

KilljoyXs avatar KilljoyX Yeah You Are +3Reply

Of you ever used of instead of of?

Kionixs avatar Kionix Yeah You Are +3Reply

No people just don't care.

Like it doesn't matter that much, sure it's technically wrong but if people know what you mean, it isn't that big a problem.

Assangeofficials avatar Assangeofficial Yeah You Are +3Reply

It's a minor issue compared to the incorrect use of their, there and they're.

Do y'all not realize it's just people are hearing should've as the contraction? It's literally just result of hearing and assumption. The sound " ‘ve"becomes "of" instead of have for lost people. It's not that serious

I can only assume you mean when people say "could of", "should of" etc, instead of the correct way of "could have" or "should have" because they are pronouncing it or spelling it the way it sounds when those words are put into a contraction (could've, should've) as opposed to how they should be spelled. And yes, that irks the hell out of me.

@Mytokhondria I can only assume you mean when people say "could of", "should of" etc, instead of the correct way of "could have"...

This is exactly it. As a 7th grade ELA teacher, I have had to explain this many times to my students. They are always surprised at it.

@Vic8760 This is exactly it. As a 7th grade ELA teacher, I have had to explain this many times to my students. They are...

How though? I learned contractions in maybe 3rd or 4th grade, it seems strange that they wouldn't know this until 7th

KilljoyXs avatar KilljoyX Yeah You Are +1Reply
@KilljoyX How though? I learned contractions in maybe 3rd or 4th grade, it seems strange that they wouldn't know this until 7th

It isn't something I used to see much of, but over time curriculum has become too packed and standardized tests so heavily used for accountability, that things like spelling, phonics, and parts of speech are covered less and less. When you don't know how those things work together, you don't notice what is grammatically wrong as long as it makes sense to you. People rely on spell check which won't hit on "would of" as it's not technically spelled wrong, so it must be right, and it sounds right to the person using it. I am sure there are other reasons as well.

synthsexuals avatar synthsexual Yeah You Are +3Reply
@Mytokhondria I can only assume you mean when people say "could of", "should of" etc, instead of the correct way of "could have"...

Alright, but when has ‘have' ever sounded like ‘of'? ‘Have' sounds more ‘uv' than ‘ov' if anything.

@bigdaddy69-4life Alright, but when has ‘have' ever sounded like ‘of'? ‘Have' sounds more ‘uv' than ‘ov' if anything.

It isn't that 'have' sounds like 'of' but rather in contractions, such as 'should've', the pronounciation tends to sound more like 'should of' instead of 'should have'. So, if you only hear 'I should've done this' you won't necessarily know that it means 'I should HAVE done this'.

@bigdaddy69-4life Alright, but when has ‘have' ever sounded like ‘of'? ‘Have' sounds more ‘uv' than ‘ov' if anything.

People often pronounce or spell the way they hear it and part of that could be blamed on lazy or improper pronunciation. The same might be said when you see people writing "for all intensive purposes" when it's really "for all intents and purposes", or "could care less" instead of couldn't care less", eggcorns" instead of "acorns", etc.

There's even a phrase for this type of malapropism, and it's literally called eggcorns - which means it's a result of mishearing or misinterpreting an actual word or phrase.

@freq432 People often pronounce or spell the way they hear it and part of that could be blamed on lazy or improper...

Wait people think it's eggcorns :D

These are all so wild as someone who learned English as a second language. When you need to manually learn everything, you of course would then know all of these from the get-go. Especially would have/would've. You practice that one a bunch.

@stevnev88 Wait people think it's eggcorns :D These are all so wild as someone who learned English as a second language. When...

There are people who do say "eggcorns", unfortunately. That's actually where the term "eggcorns" to denote a malapropism of a word or phrase came from.

Unfortunately, I've also seen people use "udderly" when they meant "utterly". Despite the initial amusement that may bring, it's actually quite sad.

Just be thankful people haven't started spelling library as "liberry".

Professor-kaosss avatar Professor-kaoss Yeah You Are +2Reply
@freq432 People often pronounce or spell the way they hear it and part of that could be blamed on lazy or improper...

I know somebody who's been saying "matters well" for "might as well" their whole life, and only recently learned the correct one. "I matters well go to the store since I have an hour to kill anyway."

I haven't seen this so much but what irks me is the use of "his" instead of "he's"....

It bugs me when native English speakers do this and English isn't even my first language.

Boknows12s avatar Boknows12 Yeah You Are +2Reply
@Boknows12 It bugs me when native English speakers do this and English isn't even my first language.

native English speakers often speak poor English. The thing is, this is an extremely well known fact around the world. What nobody talks about though, is that many (if not most) native speakers of practically every other major language around the world speak in quite a broken/improper manner most of the time too. Hell, I'm willing to bet you yourself don't speak your own native language perfectly all the time. If any other bilingual/trilingual/etc person sees this and really thinks about it, they will probably find that they also do it.

Some-Noname-idks avatar Some-Noname-idk Yeah You Are +5Reply
@Some-Noname-idk native English speakers often speak poor English. The thing is, this is an extremely well known fact around the...

That's true, but saying "should of" instead of "should've" is an extremely egregious example of speaking poorly. I assure you I'm equally annoyed by people making mistakes of that caliber in my native language.

@Boknows12 It bugs me when native English speakers do this and English isn't even my first language.

At least multilingual people have an excuse. People who speak and have spoken only English their entire lives, however, don't. In fact, sometimes I think that multilinguals have better English grammar than most native English speakers themselves!

dankXDs avatar dankXD Yeah You Are +3Reply

Ehhh, I think people are just stupid, and learn word of mouth sometimes more than they do from their english classes.

It's much better than reading "you're a looser"

I believe in Hanlon's Razor and feel it's more likely they're just dumb and confusing the sound of the contraction and spelling it out as they hear it.

ambitiouscorners avatar ambitiouscorner Yeah You Are +2Reply

The way I see it, people mix this up because when speaking they abbreviate their words like 'Should've' and 'could've' which sounds closer to 'should of' and 'could of' then 'should have' and 'could have'.

I don't really know, maybe I should have looked into it more and then I could of gave a better explanation.

(Yes I did that on purpose)

"Coulda" is best. Instantly offends every pedantic neurotic

@browndog888 "Coulda" is best. Instantly offends every pedantic neurotic

Speaking as a pedantic neurotic, I don't mind that one, because nobody thinks it's the correct spelling. People use it as slang. When people say "could of" they're trying to write properly.

Some-Noname-idks avatar Some-Noname-idk Yeah You Are +1Reply
@Some-Noname-idk Speaking as a pedantic neurotic, I don't mind that one, because nobody thinks it's the correct spelling. People...

Until eventually someone comes along and says "Periodt," leaving us wondering whether they were a master troll or fully stupid

Thatoneduderyans avatar Thatoneduderyan Yeah You Are +1Reply
@contextrip "Prolly" is up there for me. I strongly dislike it.

Prolly just feels like colorful slang to me.

Bf3247s avatar Bf3247 Yeah You Are +1Reply

I think those people are called 'the have-nots'

I remember when I was a child somebody tried to convince me that the phrase was "on accident" instead of "by accident" and I'm still angry about it

Not as bad as "Did he used to?"

Thatoneduderyans avatar Thatoneduderyan Yeah You Are +2Reply

Should of and should've sound exactly alike. It bugs you when people say it, or when they spell it incorrectly?

I noticed something like this with combining words that are often together but are not one word like ‘she's my ‘bestfriend' or I'm going home to ‘workout'.

*I know workout is it's own word when used as a noun but should be separated when used as a verb.

They also use on instead of by

I'd did something "on" accident.

I don't remember being able to sit on accident

no it's not on purpose people are actually dumb

That just means you didn't notice it until someone else pointed it out.

Some-Noname-idks avatar Some-Noname-idk Yeah You Are +2Reply

Same as saying on accident instead of by accident

Have course they do.

vcsandfecess avatar vcsandfeces Yeah You Are +1Reply
@vcsandfeces Have course they do.

I of never used it myself. Well kind have maybe

@vcsandfeces Have course they do.

I of committed several war crimes

@Huemaninstrument Should of, would of, could of.

I actually figured out why it's even a thing - it comes from the abreviasion of 've - i.e. should've, which sounds like should of.

Or did everyone already know that?

Boknows12s avatar Boknows12 Yeah You Are +1Reply
@Boknows12 I actually figured out why it's even a thing - it comes from the abreviasion of 've - i.e. should've, which sounds...

Yeah I think most people know but it's part of the vernacular like "y'all" or people in my area say "it don't matter" instead of "it doesn't matter" but in a lot of cases including my own I know "it don't matter" isn't grammatically correct but I say it that way anyway because a majority of the people I interact with say it like that. When I lived in the Southern U.S. I picked up a different dialect after a few years and a bit of an accent, a different accent that is. Social media especially something with a character count is pretty informal and anywhere emojis and abbreviations are common I wouldn't put much stock in people being grammatically correct.

@Boknows12 I actually figured out why it's even a thing - it comes from the abreviasion of 've - i.e. should've, which sounds...

A lot of U.S. folks didn't pay attention in English class 😂😂 Pretty sad for natural born Americans when non-English speaking country folks know the language better than native Americans

lazar94s avatar lazar94 Yeah You Are +1Reply
@lazar94 A lot of U.S. folks didn't pay attention in English class 😂😂 Pretty sad for natural born Americans when...

I believe that it's the way it is, My mother tongue is not English, but its my favourite language and rivals my birth language, and I read a whole lot of English everyday, I make an effort everyday to understand English, and I am even learning Latin by way of English.

Professor-kaosss avatar Professor-kaoss Yeah You Are +2Reply
@Professor-kaoss I believe that it's the way it is, My mother tongue is not English, but its my favourite language and rivals my...

Now learn colloquial dialects all throughout the United States where grammar rules shift and sway like the breeze.

lazar94s avatar lazar94 Yeah You Are +1Reply

"I have been on the internet every single day for decades"

Don't you mean "I of been on the internet every single day for decades"

Hear me out. Just because others have been corrected on their poor grammar, doesn't mean everyone on earth now knows the correct way. There's 8 billion of us. We're going to keep repeating the same mistakes.

I hate "embarrassed of" (which definitely should be "embarrassed by"). BY ppl, it's BY🧐

Mrtechnohawks avatar Mrtechnohawk Yeah You Are +1Reply

Cue all of the so called language experts saying it's just "evolving".

It's their go-to excuse for not wanting to hurt anyone's feelings.

"Pacifically" drives me up the bloody wall! People even say it as well!

@Shiny244 "Pacifically" drives me up the bloody wall! People even say it as well!

Defiantly instead of definitely is my personal hellhole

Professor-kaosss avatar Professor-kaoss Yeah You Are +4Reply
@Professor-kaoss Defiantly instead of definitely is my personal hellhole

SAME. No one ever points this out, either!! My husband and I have an inside joke. In person, we actually say "defiantly" to each other when we mean to say "definitely."

Achilles982s avatar Achilles982 Yeah You Are +1Reply
@Achilles982 SAME. No one ever points this out, either!! My husband and I have an inside joke. In person, we actually say...

Non native speaker, was convinced definately was a correct alternative spelling, cause I've read it so often online.

@Shiny244 "Pacifically" drives me up the bloody wall! People even say it as well!

What does that word even refer to?? Tf is pacifically?

vcsandfecess avatar vcsandfeces Yeah You Are +3Reply
@vcsandfeces What does that word even refer to?? Tf is pacifically?

Pacific Ocean like.

No but more of doing something in a calm or peaceful manner.

Ah yes the slow death of grammar

Kids are too busy learning about all the genders to be expected to learn and use proper grammar, give them a break.

this reminds me of when people say "a whole nother"

Mcgee0s avatar Mcgee0 Yeah You Are 0Reply

People on tiktok are stupid

Milkzeys avatar Milkzey Yeah You Are 0Reply
Please   login   or signup   to leave a comment.