+159 We don't know the accents of anyone from even 150 years ago, amirite?

by Anonymous 11 months ago

Kinda disagree. Somebody found out that if Shakespeare is read in the accent of the 'hillbillies' / mountain people of the southern Appalachian Range in the US, it \*rhymes\*. So we know that, at least.

by Anonymous 11 months ago

Do you we know if anyone used an accent like the 'hillbillies' / mountain people of the southern Appalacian Range in the US 150 years ago? Also, I would very much appreciate a recording of someone doing that if you know a source. That's a fascinating observation.

by Anonymous 11 months ago

We have a surprisingly good idea, actually. We can look at things like rhymes and misspellings, and the occasional writing on pronunciation. There's also a whole branch of science about how languages evolve, which means that we can make decent guesses about what people sounded like even before writing.

by Anonymous 11 months ago

Depends on where you live honestly, I'm from Europe and there's been times I heard people have fueds with a village a walking distance away, and making fun of how they pronounce a single word slightly differently. I can only deduce that this pettiness probably transcends a few generations. Going into the country is a bit of a form of time travel.

by Anonymous 11 months ago

Not what I meant. The gramophone wasn't invented until 1887, meaning that the oldest recorded voice is only 136 years old

by Anonymous 11 months ago

Media is not the only form of recording history, oral tradition also goes a long way. There's a few lullabies that I know that I sing in an accent entirely differently from my normal speaking voice, same with some poems. Of course there is no 100% certainty that they are spoken exactly as when those were written, but chances are, it's pretty close.

by Anonymous 11 months ago