+154 Cheap basic iodized salt is the Best! amirite?

by Anonymous 6 months ago

Iodine is vital for your health and people used to eat it separately, then they added it to salt so people would get their iodine, and now a lot of people are deficient because they don't buy iodized salt. Source: random copypastas on the internet.

by Anonymous 6 months ago

Iodine is *especially* important for prenatal. Iodizing salt led to a massive reduction in the number of children born with mental retardation.

by Anonymous 6 months ago

The average IQ also went up 15 points after we started iodizing salt.

by Anonymous 6 months ago

I used Himalayan salt for a while because it was on sale at Costco. I went back to regular salt right after and didn't notice a difference.

by Anonymous 6 months ago

I can't be the only person who thinks using Himalayan salt is environmentally... questionable. Like, let's go out of our way to exploit an ancient salt deposit (even though it just tastes like normal salt), create a whole *mining* industry around it, use third-world labor, mine it ad infinitum (until it is gone), and ship it to the other side of the globe – with all the energy expenditure and pollution that entails. Because that is totally sustainable. All because it's pink? Tell me what I'm missing...

by Anonymous 6 months ago

It's mystical\~ doncha know.

by Anonymous 6 months ago

It's all identical sodium chloride, no difference. Anything else is either dirt in it, or the purchaser is a pretentious tool, fooled by marketing nonsense.

by Anonymous 6 months ago

If you pay more for sea salt, you're a sucker. All salt is sea salt.

by Anonymous 6 months ago

1. Idiozed salt is reinventing the wheel. It used to just be regular ass rock salt that you broke up. 2. Texture. If you're putting it *on* your food, you should absolutely use ground salt (you can adjust the size). If it's going *in* your food (sauces, soups, dough, whatever), yeah, the smaller stuff is better and easier.

by Anonymous 6 months ago

You sound like my stepdad. Who puts salt on literally everything ( I've seen him put it on pickles)

by Anonymous 6 months ago

iodized salt has a funny taste. its really noticable if you eat a tiny pinch of iodized salt after eating a pinch of sea/kosher salt. whether or not you can taste it in the finished dish depends on the dish and how much salt you add, but in general, why would i want to put anything that tastes off in my food at all when a version exists that does not have an off flavor? >2. It's small granules cling to almost anything you put it on. Kosher salt just bounces off of stuff when you sprinkle it on. salt should not need to cling to your food, you should season it while cooking, and the salt dissolves. >3. It's easy to work with. I hate have to spend five minutes twisting my salt out of a grinder. you can buy fine sea/kosher salt thats the same texture as iodized, it does not need to be in flakes or come from a grinder. >It makes stuff salty fast. Sea salt is so weak. It takes too much of it. kinda, but not really. salt is salt. 1g of sea salt will make your food exactly as salty as 1g of iodized salt, the difference is volume. grains of iodized salt are smaller, meaning 1tsp of iodized salt weighs a lot more than 1tsp of sea salt. when you use sea salt, youre not actually using more salt, you are using a larger volume of salt. >There's no need to reinvent the wheel. mortons reinvented the wheel by adding iodine and flowing agents to salt. sea salt and kosher salt came first, so nobody is reinventing anything - sea salt and kosher salt are what most of the world has used as salt for the vast majority of human history, iodized salt is the reinvention.

by Anonymous 6 months ago