+664 Going into a movie or tv show with expectations of what you think it should be is setting yourself up for failure. amirite?

by Anonymous 2 months ago

"Pessimism is great because you'll never be disappointed" is a shockingly popular mentality I do not understand.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

The other option seems to be fantasizing your own movie or show plot for months or years and then becoming irrationally angry when they didn't read your mind. Then you go hassle screenwriters on social media about it, because that's apparently fine now even though anyone who didn't just fall off of a turnip truck *knows* that a screenwriter's "final draft" will be rewritten a half dozen times by other people and noted to death by execs before it's made.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

Yes, my favorite part about online nerd rage is how much of it is literally just, "I wrote a way better script than this-well not *wrote* wrote but I've definitely daydreamed about it a lot and my friends said it was good-and I am *furious* that Hollywood didn't read the inside of my head, me specifically, the main character."

by Anonymous 3 months ago

the expectations were not set by me, they were set by the people who used its connection to an existing IP to lure me in Your opinion is basically saying "expecting to get a burger when you order an item from the menu called burger is setting yourself up for failure" I'm not the one that chose the label. All I can do is follow it.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

Damn, OP had me convinced, but you convinced me back. Great argument.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

Oh no, those darned Tolkien fans that expected RoP to be authentic to the source material, those heathens!!

by Anonymous 3 months ago

They cried just as hard about the Peter Jackson trilogy. A lot of the same people too. They just don't talk about it because we clowned them about it for ten solid years afterwards. Rings of Power is just okay. But we also live in a world where the third Hobbit movie exists. Hardcore ringers are even worse than Trekkies for just being the most pedantic people on Earth who treat their favorite fiction like it's the King James Bible.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

>They cried just as hard about the Peter Jackson trilogy. 1. No, they didn't. 2. Peter Jackson's trilogy was great on its own merit. "The Rings of Power" was Peter Jackson's LOTR from Wish. Its makers even copied Jackson's visual style, only they did it badly. Tbh, I don't care much about Tolkien and his works, but, honestly, I didn't like "The Rings of Power" at all.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

But I think it comes from a place of wanting what you love to succeed. Like I'm huge into Pokémon, I've been so critical of it in recent years. If I loved a classic franchise like LotR, which requires dedication I mean those books aren't easy to read for one thing...I'd expect those who adapt it for film and TV to do it as authentic to the source material as possible :)

by Anonymous 3 months ago

You'd have a point if 50% of a films budget weren't just for marketing. We're TOLD what we should expect from media months before it's release. This isn't people randomly making up ideas on their own. Marketing firms get paid millions and millions to tell people to expect X only for them to end up watching Y.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

You were told that Roland would be white? You were told he'd have blue eyes? You were told that Rings of Power would hug the source material like its life depended on it? I'm not talking about "this was in the trailer, but not in the movie". Those aren't in my examples. I'm talking about "Perrin wasn't married to Laila in the books pfft this show sucks" or "They gimped Hulk in the MCU in the comics he was <blah blah blah> so these movies suck".

by Anonymous 3 months ago

I mean it kind of depends. I do kind of agree that to some extent if you are disappointed because of expectations you had not playing out, its not 100% on the movie, but I dont think its always the fault of the individual either. Like a few months ago I watched the movie dragon ball super- super hero expecting it to be a movie focusing on Gohan, when I saw that it was really a piccolo movie with a little gohan sprinkled in, I was a little disappointed considering at the time gohan was my 2nd favorite character. But at the same time I only adopted these expectations because of all the clues pointing to it being so, the trailer, beast gohan being talked about for months, and even the name of the movie made me think gohan was going to play a bigger role, I still enjoyed the movie but every expectation I had was brought on by outside forces and the movie itself.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

Or you don't make a series based on a beloved franchise, if youre changing everything anyway. Unless the changes make the adaptation better, like The Boys for an example. Also the expectations are set by the people who choose to adapt a beloved franchise. I mean you really have to be delusional to think that people won't have such expectations.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

I 100% agree. A lot of times when I see people (in my opinion, unfairly) bashing something it often ends up that they are judging it based on what it isn't instead of what it actually is or intended to be. To me it's a really weird way to think about things.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

Bro is talking about when not everyone in the audience knows the source material when it's obvious that the people making these shows/ movies don't know or care to know either and thats how we got ROP, the Halo show, and The Witcher (Thank God for Cavil caring about the lore).

by Anonymous 3 months ago

Honestly, I agree with this point but adaptations are a poor example to argue it with because those are built on established expectations. Yeah, most people have an overly rigid idea of how adaptations should look but there's a difference between wanting your favourite book to be represented well and getting really made a fan theory you were super invested in didn't come true

by Anonymous 3 months ago

Going into ANYTHING with expectations is a setup for failure.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

What if the trailer sets up a certain expectation (like it being an exciting action movie) but the movie is actually different, like a slow drama with one action scene? It's not that I totally disagree with you, but I also think it's weird to look at a movie franchise or adaption and not be surprised when fans are disappointed. It just begs the question, if the adaption isn't like the source material then why make it an adaption in the first place? Why not just make an original movie?

by Anonymous 3 months ago

Brand recognition. It sells more tickets. That's really it. There's definitely a line here with expectations. If I went to see a Terminator after reading about it and it being advertised as an action movie but it turns out to be a straight romcom, that's a problem. But if a Terminator sequel comes out and I hate it because it didn't involve time travel this time, that's stupid.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

Why is the brands ability to sell more tickets more important than the viewers opinion? You're basically saying there is nothing wrong with the creators decisions but everything wrong with the viewers opinions. Why?

by Anonymous 3 months ago

I did not say it was ok. I answered your question of why they do it.

by Anonymous 3 months ago

You could say that about many things and it would still not be an unpopular opinion

by Anonymous 3 months ago

i agree, i actually dont watch reviews, or even trailers of movies and such i really want to see, hell sometimes i dont even read the description. its lead to a lot of movies being great to me

by Anonymous 3 months ago