+29 The word ‘Scrabble' can never be played on the first turn. amirite?

by No-Gas-3396 1 month ago

According to French rules, it cannot be played on the next turns either

by DearRhubarb6151 1 month ago

The game is a proper noun, but "scrabble" is also verb that means to desperately or clumsily scratch: "His hands scrabbled at the loose dirt as he slid toward the cliff's looming edge."

by Big_Method 1 month ago

I would never use that form tho. It was sounds so awkward and unnatural. "His hands were scrambling for the loose dirt as he slid toward the cliff's looming edge."

by StrictMarch 1 month ago

Whether or not you would use the word has no bearing on whether or not the word is legally playable

by Anonymous 1 month ago

I'm reader and writer not a scramble player. I'm not saying it's an ineligible word in the game of scramble, but that I forgot it was even a real word because irl no one uses like that. It's more an observation then a criticism.

by StrictMarch 1 month ago

Sir, it's Scrumble.

by No-Gas-3396 1 month ago

He knows. He's reader and writer not a Scrumble player.

by Theresacruicksh 1 month ago

I like scrabbled eggs.

by Anonymous 1 month ago

you just used it

by Anonymous 1 month ago

You're not gonna believe this, but different people, write differently. Absolutely crazy, I know.

by Latter_Set_7836 1 month ago

That's not a different form, that's a different word entirely.

by Anonymous 1 month ago

Yep, just because of that. And thanks!

by DearRhubarb6151 1 month ago

it's also not a proper noun. Would French rules prohibit the word 'polish' because it is identical to 'Polish'?

by Anonymous 1 month ago

No, because french people don't say "polish", nor do they say "scrabble" as a verb. They speak a different language, remember

by Anonymous 1 month ago

It has another meaning in English but not in French. It is only a proper noun in French, but it is also a verb in English, hence the difference.

by Anonymous 1 month ago

So, there's nothing special about French rules here. It's just that playing Scrabble in French uses French words. Ok. Thanks

by Anonymous 1 month ago

Mais c'est ok d'utiliser "baby-sitter".... et "ok"! Bon anniversaire.

by Anonymous 1 month ago

*oké

by Anonymous 1 month ago

It is also a verb.

by Odd_Telephone5763 1 month ago

I do not know the rules of scrabble but find this strangely interesting. Can you explain?

by Anonymous 1 month ago

The low likelihood of ever being able to play the word 'scrabble' is why my family has a home rule that you win instantly if you play it.

by Anonymous 1 month ago

And only if the first word is crab or rabble.

by Anonymous 1 month ago

No, it's an eight letter word, so you could play through any of its constituent letters if they were played on the board. So if your opponent played DEMO, you could respond with a play of SCRABBL(E), assuming you had the necessary letters.

by Busy_Leg 1 month ago

True, but if the opponent plays DEMO, your best response is to add an N to make it DEMON, then play a badass guitar solo while the room lights flicker on and off.

by Big_Method 1 month ago

I'm just gonna leave this here.

by Anonymous 1 month ago

Pfft. They probably judged the song by the first few seconds and didn't even make it to the guitar solo.

by Anonymous 1 month ago

Really, if you've all the other letters besides a vowel out of scrabble, you could play it off any of those vowels on the second turn, too. For 50 bonus points to boot, but never on the first one.

by No-Gas-3396 1 month ago

besides a vowel Why can't you play it off an opponents consonant?

by Anonymous 1 month ago

You could for sure, vowels are far more likely is all

by No-Gas-3396 1 month ago

You need a crab on the board before you can even consider it!

by Annual-Total 1 month ago

I'm unsure where the French Scrabble comes into this, I bet the rules are similar. It's less nuance and more just insufficient tiles on the first hand.

by No-Gas-3396 1 month ago