Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@deusvult ok fine, but businesses still have a right to refuse service to anyone they choose, like it or not. and employers...

Obviously, an employer won’t hire me in the first place, if I don’t accept their dress codes. My profession has no problems with the hijab and if anyone does, it’s their call and I have no right to question that. It’s the people, once again. I’m not employed by the person on the street or in the train. Is it acceptable to have people scream at you to go back to your country, or wherever you came from just because you cover your head?

Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@deusvult laws have to be followed, if I went to your country of origin how would they take to me demanding they bend their...

I’m sorry but I posted an image to explain that the hijab does not cover the face. It’s a headscarf. There’s no law against it, just people.

Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@JustJimColo I'm sure Islamic "scholars" are as self serving as other religious scholars in interpreting things the way they...

The scholars collect their evidence from religious books but so do the other scholars who say that covering the face is not compulsary. At the end, it depends on a person’s intention. That is all that matters.

The End.

(You don’t have to read the following unless you don’t understand what I said or have a couple of minutes to read. It can be boring and I’m sorry but I felt the need to say it.)

Let me put it this way. I live in a rather conservative part of the world right now. Even when I go out wearing the hijab, there are men who stare as if they’ve never seen a woman in their life. That’s uncomfortable. I can educate the boys in my family but not the whole society. Then, I’ve been to other countries before I started wearing the hijab and I dressed up casually and no one cared. Now, I wear the hijab because I believe in the part of our religion that said, ‘wear the hijab to identify as muslims’, and I do believe in the other part that says, ‘wear it to be modest and guard your private parts’ but I just don’t believe a niqab makes me any more modest than a hijab, and I can dress up modestly without the hijab in a cultured society where men wear the hijab(lower their gaze), but the purpose of hijab is also to identify as a muslim and that’s why I wear it.

In my opinion, everyone believes differently, and being a muslim is clearly defined by praying, charity, fasting and testifying. There are christians who don’t do things that the bible wants them to, and so many muslims who pray for the sake of religion and go on to commit what are major sins. Everyone is different and I know that whenever I pinpoint the good things in my religion, there will be some historic incidents that people will use aginst me but all I know is that no scholar, no person is perfect as a muslim and we can never tell. I could explain the whole thing to a person who wears a niqab, but if they don’t want to believe me, I cannot make them.

Now suppose I’m sinning by showing my face, are the eyes not the most beautiful part of the face, is it wrong to believe that there’s more to a human’s personality than their face that can be beautiful, why does islam prohibit the veil in huge gatherings like the hajj and sonething so religious as prayers? Didn’t Allah clearly say that all sins except the major sins will be forgiven except if the sin is against another human, then they must forgive you? Now, who’s going to judge me as a muslim? Why would anyone judge me as a human? We do not know the littlest about another person. All I know is that we interact with other humans and our relationship with them depends not entirely, but to some extent on how we behave. People wearing a hijab(like me) or a niqab(like people who respect the majority of scholars) know very well what others think about them. We know the consequences. I know that people wearing the headscarf like me won’t blend in like others who don’t. Despite that, I chose to wear it. People wearing a niqab know very well that they’re going to face trouble being identified and may be looked at, with fear and suspicion. Don’t you think they know? Despite that, they hang on it. They have a reason, which I reckon is the scholars’ opinion, maybe it’s something else but I’ll never know until I ask.

In my opinion, if there’s anyone in a hijab or niqab who’s bothersome, go ahead and talk to them. I’ve talked to people with the niqab and they said that scholars shouldn’t be questioned, and I always said, ‘You’re questioning the ones who say that showing the face is permissible.’ Everyone is entitled to an opinion and sometimes, both the opinions are partially correct, not yours, not mine, not the scholars’.

I’m more exhausted after having written this than you are reading this if you ever got to the end. Thanks for bearing it anyway.

Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@JustJimColo It's not a problem of it being worn by Muslim women. It's a problem when a full "mask" is worn by anyone.

Yes. I understand that. It’s only because the majority of (islamic)scholars have come to the conclusion that it is compulsary to cover the face. But then an individual is left to judge on his own, what these scriptures mean, esp. in the present times.

Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@vox Then I happily stand corrected. You, like myself, are unusual for not following a religion based on what we were...

Oh Thank you Vox. This website needs people like you. Now we don’t get a lot of happy ending arguments on this website, but they’re always interesting nevertheless. smile smilie

Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@vox Thank you for the welcome. I think you should start looking critically at your belief. Why does your belief make...

My parents are muslims but I was one only by name. I never wore the hijab, read the Quran or anything. I spent a great deal of my childhood away from them. They never forced me to dress up in a particular way, never took me to religious gatherings; they’re the same even now. They were kind of shocked I chose to wear a hijab to college.

I chose religion based on my own experience. There wasn’t much reading and justification involved. It was pure belief. Once, I saw a housemaid who was very close to me praying and I joined her. I started reading more about praying and this stuff which was really alien to me, and I did what the books said made us muslims(praying, fasting, charity, testifying). Well, surprisingly, it turned out very well for me. Things changed in the most unexpected ways. My life turned into something else, and I thought it was rather illogical to attribute it to religion, esp. after the housemaid left. Everything was okay until I joined this college where I wore the hijab because 80% of the students did and I wanted to blend in better. I started learning more about religion, and once again, the most drastic changes in my life happened. Even today, when I tell people it was just luck and I did nothing, they keep telling me I don’t want anyone to be like me. But the truth is that’s what my life is. I’ve been depressed, tired, unable to handle how unpredictable things were but now I feel better, more optimistic, and this is what it is now. Ten years back, I’d laugh at this story but now I believe in all this and I don’t think there’s anything that can chnage me. I might look superstitious, I might be stupid, I might be wrong, I might know nothing about what my religion actually is, but by doing little things and my looking upto God, I feel like I have nothing to worry about. That’s what it is. No facts. Just a belief.

Sorry about that long string. That’s just me. Foolish, stupid or whatever but I believe in my religion and I doubt it’ll change even if the rest of the World does.

Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@vox Hijab no problem. Niqab definitely not. A good exercise in thought would be if you imagine the whole world...

Hi vox. Welcome to amirite.

I’ll be really honest. if I was an atheist I’d prefer more people (not everyone) in open face, maybe even no hijab but modest clothing. But I’m not. I believe in the hijab because of my religion and I love it.

I’d never want the whole world to look the same. I love the World as it is, a mixture of hijabs, sunglasses, veils, modest, funny, traditional, a mix of everything.

I find it absurd that a person should cover their face on an ID card. It defies the purpose of it. Even in Saudi Arabia, women have to life their veil for ID cards and then again, once asked by an official to identify.

Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@JerryHendrickson I don't care what you wear but I have a problem with not being able to identify people. Wearing that, you can...

Yes, I cannot disagree with the issue people can have if a woman wears a niqab. The hijab and niqab usually mean:

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Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@Tibby I agree that disallowing the wearing of the hijab is not respectful of religious freedom. There is no reasonable...

I agree.It makes sense. There could be a lack of cultural assimilation associated with the hijab but I wouldn’t completely attribute it to that. There can be a lot of reasons for that and the hijab could be just one of them. A person will clearly find it easier to adapt without the hijab than with it, that’s where a person may give part of their religion for better adaption(that’s alright, except to me, because the hijab is dear to me).

Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@Flrdsgns You have every right to dress however you like, but people also have the right to be wary of anyone wearing a hijab.

So, I just want to make the definiton of hijab clear for anyone who has a doubt(Not you).

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Source:
https://www.hijabiworld.com/wha...jab-and-niqab/

OK. You can be wary of anyone. You can be wary of me and that’s okay as long as it doesn’t hurt me.

I would not want anyone to fear me when they look at me so, I’m just trying to understand why my hijab should be make me suspicious: I hope you don’t mind that. It’s okay if you want to completely ignore all this.

I just googled what female terrorists look like, because I should be wary of them too. If there’s any other reason for your fear, please bring it up. I looked each one of them up. Some of them are muslims but noticeably, those involved in attacks in a non muslim majority clearly don’t identify as muslims because why would they.They looked like this:

Sources:
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/new...-by-women.html

https://www.google.co.in/amp/s/...?source=images

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Having anything against muslim women for wearing the hijaab does not sound like freedom to me. As a muslim woman; to me, oppression is not being able to dress up how I want and I want to wear the hijaab. To me, oppression is not being able to explore another country for education or jobs because I’ll be told to go back to where I came from.
@Sunny_the_skeptic I guess this way of thinking comes from the hijab being seen as a symbol of oppression, forcing women to cover...

When people associate the hijab with oppression(which it may be for some people), it’s still easier for me to explain that it’s only my choice. When people look at soneone in a hijab and think, “Oh, here’s the person who believes in polygamy and here’s the one who wants to kill everyone.” That’s when problems arise. Sure, I choose to display what religion I belong to because it’s my belief, but there’s no reason for anyone to make assumptions about the other parts of my personality. If anyone wants to know my take on anything, I’ll be more than happy to talk. I believe in something and if I’m in a democracy/republic, I’d like mysel to be respected, atleast because I’m not bothering anyone.

What famous person shares your birthday?

24 June

1979 – Mindy Kaling, American actress and producer
1986 – Solange Knowles, American singer-songwriter and actress
1987 – Lionel Messi, Argentinian Footballer
1992 – David Alaba, Austrian footballer

These are the only ones I know. Most of the people in the list were football or baseball players.